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Far-right activists hope to use alt-lite label to distance themselves from white supremacists

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A subset of far-right activists are seeking to distance themselves from the problematic label of “alt-right.”

As The Intercept reports, in the days since Charlottesville, the far-right has adopted yet another phrase to identify followers of its ideology, this time in an apparent effort to ward off claims of racism and neo-Nazism.

The term, according to followers of this allegedly milder ideology, is “alt-lite.”

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Vice Media co-founder Gavin McInnes, who founded the “Proud Boys” movement, says his group does not tolerate racial discrimination. Instead, their interest is in “Reinstating a Spirit of Western chauvinism.”

On his “Rebel Media” YouTube show, McInnes said that while the alt-right is made up racial chauvinists, the alt-lite is made up of cultural chauvinists.

But critics doubt that is much of a distinction.

“The split between the white nationalists of the ‘alt-right’ and the often racist demagogues of the ‘alt-light’ is strategically significant, and factored into the far-right’s failure to mobilize further post-Charlottesville,” the Intercept’s Leighton Akip Woodouse writes. “But the actual difference between the two may be more a matter of style than substance.”

McInnes publicly disavowed the so-called “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, weeks before it took place.

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The Anti-Defamation League describes the movement as “a loosely connected movement of right-wing activists who reject the overtly white supremacist ideology of the alt right, but whose hateful impact is more significant than their “lite” name suggests. The alt lite embraces misogyny and xenophobia, and abhors “political correctness” and the left.

(Correction: A previous version of this story incorrectly stated that the Proud Boys played a prominent role in the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville.)


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
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‘I’m getting shot’: Shocking video shows police in Louisville hitting journalists with pepper bullets

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Police fired pepper bullets at a camera crew doing a live broadcast of the police violence protests in Louisville on Friday evening.

"WAVE 3 News reporter Kaitlin Rust appeared to have been hit by rubber bullets reportedly fired by an LMPD officer during a protest in downtown Louisville," the station reported.

Rust was wearing a fluorescent safety vest at the time of the incident.

"I'm getting shot," she shouted.

The news anchor asked, "who are they aiming that at?"

"At us, like directly at us," she replied. "Directly at us!"

"He's shooting at our crew," another anchor noted.

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Chicago Mayor Lightfoot to Trump: ‘What I really want to say … begins with F and it ends with U’

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CHICAGO — Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot on Friday ripped President Donald Trump, saying he’s fomenting violence and playing to racist urges for political gain in response to the killing of a black man by a Minneapolis police officer and subsequent rioting.Lightfoot’s comments were an apparent response to Trump tweeting a message that included “When the looting starts, the shooting starts” in reply to rioting in Minneapolis and elsewhere following the death of George Floyd, a handcuffed black man who died after a white Minneapolis police officer knelt on Floyd’s neck while he was in custody. Lig... (more…)

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Law enforcement files discredit Brian Kemp’s accusation that Democrats tried to hack the Georgia election

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It was a stunning accusation: Two days before the 2018 election for Georgia governor, Republican Brian Kemp used his power as secretary of state to open an investigation into what he called a “failed hacking attempt” of voter registration systems involving the Democratic Party.

But newly released case files from the Georgia Bureau of Investigation reveal that there was no such hacking attempt.

The evidence from the closed investigation indicates that Kemp’s office mistook planned security tests and a warning about potential election security holes for malicious hacking.

Kemp then wrongly accused his political opponents just before Election Day — a high-profile salvo that drew national media attention in one of the most closely watched races of 2018.

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