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Girlfriend’s sisters: Las Vegas gunman ‘sent her away’ so she wouldn’t interfere with massacre

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Marilou Danley’s sisters are breaking their silence after she left for Las Vegas. They explained that the shooter, Stephen Paddock “sent [her] away” so that she would not stop or otherwise interfere with his plan for the massacre that killed 58 people.

Danley’s plane touched down in Los Angeles late Tuesday night and she was quickly rushed away by the FBI for questioning. Further reports said that Danley was cooperating with the authorities to gather further information about Paddock’s motive.

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The sisters spoke to Seven News in Australia, explaining the shock they and their sister felt seeing the news. According to them, she arrived in the Philippines two weeks ago, after Paddock bought her a ticket

“I know that she doesn’t know anything as well like us,” one sister told the outlet, their identities blurred for privacy. “She was sent away. She was away so that she will not be there to interfere with what he’s planning.”

Paddock then wired Danley $127,000.

“She didn’t even know that she was going to the Philippines until Steve said ‘Marilou, I found you a cheap ticket to the Philippines,'” the sisters continued. “In that sense I thank him for sparing my sister’s life.”

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The women also explained that Danley is likely the only person who can “put the puzzles together” after Paddock took his own life.

“To be able to find out the person you love and live with can do such a thing and you thought you know the person yourself,” one sisters said.

The 62-year-old is originally from Queensland, Australia.

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Watch clips of the interview below:


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NYT reporter explains how a Trump war with Iran could spiral out of control: ‘Playing with fire’

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As President Donald Trump pugnaciously warned on Twitter this weekend that the United States is “locked and loaded” to go after Iran following a recent attack on oil infrastructure in Saudi Arabia, foreign policy experts and observers with actual insight into the situation warned that a conflict in the region could spiral out of control.

New York Times reporter Michael Crowley, appearing on MSNBC’s “Deadline: White House” on Thursday, argued that a war with Iran could be much more disastrous and challenging than the devastating Iraq War was.

“It would be a huge, huge, mess,” Crowly said. “Iraq at least was country that we were able to militarily defeat and occupy pretty quickly, and then you had this horrible, long occupation with an insurgency that was disastrous. But in the case of Iran, it’s just a much more formidable military adversary with a lot more ways to counterattack and retaliate and escalate. Israel gets dragged in, the global economy could go up in flames. So you’re not just thinking about a theoretical political principle while Trump is betraying his base — it’s that Trump is inviting, if he were to risk a serious conflict with Iran, a potential debacle in so many ways.”

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Apple slams EU as epic court battle over tax bill begins

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Apple went on the offensive against Brussels in an EU court on Tuesday, fighting the European Commission's landmark order that the iPhone-maker reimburse Ireland 13 billion euros ($14 billion) in back taxes.

The EU's tax demand, delivered in 2016, "defies reality and common sense," Apple's lawyer Daniel Beard told the EU's lower General Court.

The commission's "conclusion... is wrong," he added.

The commission's historic decision was delivered in August 2016 by Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager, a shock decision that put Europe at the forefront of an emerging effort to rein in the power of US big tech.

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Israel votes on Netanyahu’s political survival

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Israel votes Tuesday in its second election in five months, determining whether to extend Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's term as the country's longest-serving prime minister despite corruption allegations against him.

The stakes could not be much higher for the 69-year-old right-wing leader who, as in April polls, faces a strong challenge from ex-military chief Benny Gantz and his centrist Blue and White alliance.

Ex-defense minister Avigdor Lieberman, Netanyahu's former right-hand man turned rival, could play a kingmaker role with his campaign to "make Israel normal again."

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