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Russian-linked Trump campaign aide pleads guilty to making false statements to FBI

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George Papadopoulos, the former Trump campaign aide who repeatedly tried to set up meetings with Russian government officials, has pleaded guilty to making false statements to FBI agents.

According to the indictment, Papadopoulos made his false statements to agents earlier this year in January. The former Trump campaign aide, who joined the campaign in March of 2016, made false statements about the nature of his contacts with Russian-linked figures.

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“Papadopoulos claimed that his interactions with an overseas professor, who defendant Papadopoulos understood to have substantial connections to Russian government officials, occurred before [he] became a foreign policy adviser to the campaign,” the indictment (PDF) alleges.

“Papadopoulos acknowledged that the professor had told him about the Russians possessing ‘dirt’ on then-candidate Hillary Clinton in the form of ‘thousands of emails,’ but stated multiple times that he learned that information prior to joining the campaign. In truth and in fact, however… Papadopoulos learned he would be an advisor to the campaign in early March, and met the professor on or about March 14, 2016.”

The indictment also alleges that Papadopoulos told FBI agents that the professor in question was an unimportant figure — even though agents later determined that Papadopoulos knew full well about the professor’s deep ties to the Kremlin.

Additionally, Papadopoulos told FBI agents that he had very limited interactions with an unidentified Russian woman — but agents later learned that he reached out to her with the specific intention of arranging meetings between the Trump campaign and Russian government officials.

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“After his trip to Washington, D.C. defendant PAPADOPOULOS worked with the Professor and the Female Russian National to arrange a meeting between the Campaign and the Russian government, and took steps to advise the Campaign of his progress,” the indictment states.


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Lindsey Graham backs up Trump’s widely condemned impeachment tirade: ‘A lynching in every sense’

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President Donald Trump's widely condemned comparison of House Democrats' impeachment inquiry to a "lynching" has the support of at least one Republican senator.

As reported by The Hill's Alex Bolton, Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) on Tuesday agreed that with the president's characterization of the House Democrats' efforts to hold him accountable.

"This is a lynching in every sense," Graham said.

Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) similarly agreed with Graham that House Democrats' efforts to impeach the president amount to a "lynching," as reported by Politico's Burgess Everett.

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Donald Trump is mirroring the career path of Vladimir Putin: Scientology doc maker Alex Gibney

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According to the director of the "Going Clear," the definitive documentary on Scientology, the rise of both Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin neatly mirror each other in the way that they have propelled themselves into office by using media manipulation as their most potent weapon.

As part of a discussion with the Daily Beast about his latest work, Citizen K, a look at the life of Russian dissident Mikhail Khodorkovsky, Alex Gibney said Putin's career trajectory became a major part of his story -- and he noticed extraordinary parallels with Trump.

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Princeton historian delivers the definitive smackdown of Trump’s ‘insulting’ lynching tweet

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Princeton University History Professor Kevin Kruse on Tuesday delivered a thorough takedown of President Donald Trump's claim that House Democrats' impeachment inquiry represents a "lynching."

In calling the tweet "twelve different kinds of bullsh*t," Kruse began by discussing the constitutional mechanics of the impeachment process in the House that only require a bare majority of lawmakers to favor in order to advance. Concerns about due process in impeachment only come into play in the Senate, where the president is ensured a fair trial and where two-thirds of lawmakers are needed to convict the president and remove him from office.

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