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Former Trump campaign adviser Carter Page delivers ‘irrelevant’ documents to congressional committees

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Former Trump campaign adviser Carter Page on Thursday delivered subpoenaed documents he described as “irrelevant and unnecessary” to two congressional committees investigating alleged Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.

Page, an oil industry consultant with numerous contacts in Russia, told Reuters in a text message that he delivered the documents to the Senate and House intelligence committees.

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“Just dropped irrelevant and unnecessary documents off for the Witch Hunt,” Page said in his text. “On to bigger and better things now.”

Page delivered the documents two weeks after acknowledging in an appearance before the House panel that he had not provided all relevant documents sought by a subpoena, including emails in which he and another former Trump campaign foreign policy adviser, George Papadopoulos, were included.

According to a transcript of his testimony released last week, Page said that he had not turned over the emails because he assumed that the committee “most likely would have received them from others already.” He agreed to submit them.

Under subsequent questioning, Page first cited his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination as a reason for withholding documents relevant to the committee subpoena.

He then said that, “Nothing would directly incriminate me,” but added that he was concerned about discrepancies between documents he withheld and materials collected by a government eavesdropping operation under a secret Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act warrant.

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Papadopoulos pleaded guilty last month to a charge of lying to the FBI about his efforts to arrange a meeting during the 2016 campaign between then-Republican candidate Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin. Papadopolous also agreed to cooperate with the investigation led by Special Counsel Robert Mueller of possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Moscow.

Russia denies interfering in the 2016 campaign. Trump denies there was any collusion between his campaign and what U.S. intelligence agencies charge was a Russian influence operation that was intended to sway the vote to Trump over his Democratic challenger, Hillary Clinton.

(Reporting by Jonathan Landay; Editing by Dan Grebler)

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‘A slam-dunk-case’: MSNBC analysts predict GOP will defend Trump — and ‘the guy is going to get off’

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More evidence was outed Sunday as the Wall Street Journal revealed emails from EU Ambassador Gordon Sondland, who promised to keep the White House abreast of President Donald Trump's demand for an investigation by Ukraine. The news prompted an MSNBC panelists to explain that it wouldn't matter how much evidence was presented, Republicans will never vote to remove Trump.

Host Geoff Bennett asked about the witness testimony and preponderance of evidence that "all points in one direction at this point, that President Trump orchestrated this entire" Ukraine investigations.

"It's a slam dunk case, and yet we know the guy is going to get off," said Los Angels Times White House reporter Eli Stokols. "That's effectively what you're saying. Because all the testimony has lined up so closely, the fact that [EU Ambassador Gordon] Sondland has come to come in, and because testimony from [Ambassador Bill] Taylor and others, has had to change testimony, Republicans have no choice -- the president has no choice but to try to dismiss the entire thing as partisan."

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President helped ‘increase anti-Trump turnout’ in red-state governor’s races — which could spell disaster for the GOP

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President Donald Trump was once the Republican Party's greatest asset in an election, mobilizing thousands of supporters to rush to the polls. Recently, however, it seems he's now driving anti-Trump votes up so much that it may no longer be worth the Trump trouble.

“So you’ve got to give me a big win, please,” Trump told a Louisiana crowd this week before the GOP candidate lost the governor's race in a red state.

“What Trump did in Louisiana was increase voter participation. While he increased the pro-Trump turnout, he also increased the anti-Trump turnout. That’s kind of the lesson here,” polling analyst Ron Faucheux told The Washington Post in an interview.

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Fire holds off Hong Kong police at campus as democracy protests escalate

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A large fire held off an apparent police advance on the Hong Kong campus where hundreds of pro-democracy protesters were holed up early Monday, hours after officers warned they may use "live rounds" if confronted by deadly weapons in a dangerous escalation of the near six-month crisis engulfing the city.

Protests have rocked the global financial hub since June, with many in the city of 7.5 million people venting fury at eroding freedoms under Chinese rule.

China has repeatedly warned that it will not tolerate the dissent, and there have been concerns that Beijing could send in troops to put an end to the spiralling unrest.

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