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James O’Keefe is fighting his insurance company for not paying his massive legal bills

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It turns out conservative filmmaker James O’Keefe is fighting a new battle — against his insurer.

According to BuzzFeed News, O’Keefe claims Gemini Insurance Company, the agents he hired to protect him, should be paying his massive legal bills from all the lawsuits leveled against him and his organization Project Veritas.

In September, BuzzFeed discovered, O’Keefe and Veritas sued Gemini for “wrongful denial to defend and indemnify” and breach of contract after the agency refused to pay for lawsuits against them. Those lawsuits include defamation claims taken out against Veritas and Breitbart by the president of a teacher’s union after they published a “creatively edited” undercover video that “make [Kansas teachers’ union president Steve Wentz] appear violent and dangerous.”

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Arbitration documents BuzzFeed obtained show that Gemini is fighting Veritas and O’Keefe “over coverage for four different lawsuits.”

“According to the arbitration complaint,” BuzzFeed reports, “Project Veritas and its operatives incurred more than $160,000 in legal fees without Gemini’s assistance. The complaint said that Gemini’s contract insured Project Veritas for $1,000,000 on each claim and in total, with a deductible of $25,000 for each claim.”

In their counter, Gemini said Veritas their claims didn’t fall within that policy because the group “misrepresented itself in its insurance application: specifically, Gemini said that Project Veritas reported that it had obtained consent from people appearing in its videos.”

(Correction: A previous version of this story incorrectly stated James O’Keefe was involved in a video sting operation targeting Planned Parenthood.)

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