Quantcast
Connect with us

Tennessee Baptist Convention bans church for not ‘cooperating’ by hiring female pastor

Published

on

The Tennessee Baptist Convention affirmed on Tuesday a decision to ban the First Baptist Church of Jefferson City from voting at the conservative organization’s annual meeting.

WBIR News reported the decision was based on a resolution stating “a church whose office of pastor is held by a woman is not a cooperating church.”

Following a 17-month process by a nine-member search committee and vote of the congregation during two Sunday services, Rev. Ellen Di Giosia was named pastor of First Baptist in June.

ADVERTISEMENT

“It wasn’t a surprising decision, it’s sad. It’s sad because we believe that cooperation is a hallmark of Baptist life,” Rev. Di Giosia told WBIR. “Although one of our Baptist affiliations has changed, FBC Jefferson City is the same congregation we were yesterday. We will still gather to worship, study, and pray.”

In 2015, Di Giosia told Baptist Women in Ministry of the challenges she had faced as a female pastor.

“Even in churches that hire and affirm women in ministry, there are still pockets of patriarchal weirdness,” Rev. Di Giosia explained. “I’ve been told to always wear jackets so that my elbows don’t show, have received official church correspondence addressed to ‘Mrs. [husband’s name],’ and listened as colleagues said that we couldn’t invite a woman to preach because ‘we just had one last month.’”

Rev. Di Giosia was at the time an associate pastor in Texas, and explained the intense pain she had experienced.

ADVERTISEMENT

“In one case, it became too difficult to stay, and in another, I chose to ride out an intense storm. Using family systems theory has been helpful in these cases. Asking questions such as what does it mean to bear the anxiety of a system? How can I be the presence of Christ when that anxiety has begun swirling around me?,” Di Giosia explained. “But even when you identify things academically, it is still intensely painful.”

The Tennessee Baptist Convention is the Southern Baptist Convention’s state affiliate with 3,200 affiliated churches.

“It is regrettable when one of our churches makes a decision that results in a broken confessional relationship with our TBC network of churches,” Tennessee Baptist Mission Board President and Executive Director Randy C. Davis told the Knoxville News Sentinel.

ADVERTISEMENT

The First Baptist Church traces it’s origins to the 1830s. After 140 years of partnership with the Tennessee Baptist Convention, the church says all ties have now been severed.

“This is an opportunity for [the convention] to be clear about who they are, and so we have made it an opportunity for us to be clear about who we are as a congregation,” Pastor Di Giosia told WVLT News.

ADVERTISEMENT

Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Bill Barr appears to be targeting Trump’s opponents — and senate Dems want an investigation

Published

on

In May, Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA) cornered Attorney General Bill Barr during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing.

Harris, a career prosecutor who served as San Francisco District Attorney and California Attorney General, asked Barr if the White House had ever asked for any specific investigations.

Barr struggled to answer the question.

Senator Harris: Attorney General Barr has the President or anyone at the White House ever asked or suggested that you open an investigation of anyone?Attorney General Barr: Um. I wouldn’t … I wouldn’t. uh—Senator Harris: Yes or No?Attorney General Han: Could you … could you repeat that question?Senator Harris: I will repeat it. Has the President or anyone at the White House ever asked or suggested that you open an investigation of anyone? Yes or no please, sir.Attorney General Barr: Urn, the President or anybody…Senator Harris: Seems you would remember something like that and be able to tell us.Attorney General Barr Yeah, but I’m. I’m trying to grapple with the word ‘suggest.’ I mean, there have been discussions of, of matters out there that. uh- – they have not asked me to open an investigation. But…Senator Harris: Perhaps they’ve suggested?Attorney General Barr: I don’t know. I wouldn’t say suggest…Senator Harris: Hinted?Attorney General Barr I don’t know.Senator Harris: Inferred? You don’t know?Attorney General Barr: No.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

How Trump supporters justify supporting the president in the full knowledge that he’s a criminal

Published

on

It’s been nearly two months since Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi announced a formal impeachment inquiry into President Trump, and Republicans still haven’t figured out a way to justify their predetermined conclusion: Trump is innocent. Their problem, of course, is the overwhelming evidence that Trump personally conducted an extortion and bribery scheme against Ukraine’s political leadership. As the record clearly shows, he threatened to withhold military aid and promised a White House visit in order to strong-arm President Volodymyr Zelensky into backing Trump’s false accusations against former Vice President Joe Biden and Democratic Party leaders.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Rep Mark Meadows has been the White House ‘sherpa’ on impeachment — and may be next chief of staff: report

Published

on

Mick Mulvaney, the director of the Office of Management and Budget who also works as the acting White House chief of staff, is struggling in his job as the impeachment inquiry moves to the public hearings phase.

"Mick Mulvaney is isolated, marginalized and growing more irrelevant to the West Wing staff he’s meant to lead during one of the most consequential moments of the Trump presidency," Politico reported.

Mulvaney is increasingly out of the loop on impeachment.

"Though the White House’s acting chief of staff is still participating in impeachment meetings and working out of the White House, the strategy is increasingly being driven by White House lawyers, legislative affairs team and top officials from the press and communications shops who spent the week setting up a rapid-response team and developing plans to push back on witnesses’ testimony in real-time," Politico reported. "It’s an awkward staff situation that mirrors so many moments of the Trump presidency: aides trying to proceed with business as usual while unusual dramas play out, and the very people expected to lead the effort instead witnessing jockeying by potential replacements."

Continue Reading
 
 
Help Raw Story Uncover Injustice. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1 and go ad-free.
close-image