Quantcast
Connect with us

Five dead in California shooting spree that ended at school: local media

Published

on

Five people died in a shooting spree on Tuesday that ended at a school in a remote area of rural Northern California and some children were among the wounded, according to officials and local media.

Law enforcement officers shot to death the gunman, who was among the five people who died in a series of shootings at seven or more locations, according to Redding, California, newspaper the Record Searchlight.

ADVERTISEMENT

The shooting spree began at a home and ended at Rancho Tehama School near the town of Corning, the Sacramento television station KCRA reported, citing law enforcement.

The shooter was armed with a semi-automatic rifle and two handguns, Assistant Sheriff Phil Johnston told local media.

A number of students were airlifted for medical care after gunfire at Rancho Tehama School, Johnston said.

Law enforcement did not immediately say what might have motivated the shooter.

Sheriff’s Office officials could not immediately be reached for comment.

ADVERTISEMENT

Enloe Medical Center in Chico, more than 40 miles (64 km) southeast of the school, received five patients, and three of them were treated and released, hospital spokeswoman Natali Munoz-Moore said by phone. She declined to provide any details on their conditions.

St. Elizabeth Community Hospital in the community of Red Bluff received two patients, including one who was stabilized and transferred to another facility, Amanda Harter, a spokeswoman for the facility, said in an email. Mercy Medical Center in Redding received three patients, including one who also was transferred elsewhere, said Harter, whose company, Dignity Health, runs both hospitals.

Shots were fired at the school and some people were injured at the campus but no students or staff members died, Corning Union Elementary School District administrative assistant Jeanine Quist said by phone. The area is about 120 miles (190 km) north of Sacramento.

ADVERTISEMENT

California Governor Jerry Brown said in a statement he and his wife were “saddened to hear about today’s violence in Tehama County, which shockingly involved schoolchildren.”

“We offer our condolences to the families who lost loved ones and unite with all Californians in grief,” Brown said.

ADVERTISEMENT

A parent, Coy Ferreira, said he was dropping off his daughter when he heard gunshots.

“One of the teachers came running out of the building and told us to all run inside because there was a shooter coming,” Ferreira told Redding, California, television station KRCR.

“So we all hurried up and ran and told the students to get in the classrooms.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Once inside a classroom, Ferreira said he heard gunfire for over 20 minutes and a student in the room was struck.

Brian Flint told local media his neighbor was the shooter and had stolen his truck.

The shooter’s name has not been released.

(Reporting by Alex Dobuzinskis in Los Angeles and Peter Szekely and Daniel Wallis in New York; editing by Frances Kerry and Phil Berlowitz)

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Facebook

Trump says he is Israel’s best friend — and that some Jewish-Americans ‘don’t love Israel enough’

Published

on

US President Donald Trump aimed to make inroads Saturday in the politically important Jewish-American vote with a Florida speech where he declared himself the best friend Israel has ever had.

At a conference in Hollywood, Florida, the Republican real estate magnate said Jewish-Americans had been wrong to vote for Democrats under his predecessor Barack Obama.

"So many of you voted for people in the last administration," he said.

"Someday you'll have to explain that to me because I don't think they liked Israel too much."

By contrast, Trump said, "the Jewish state has never had a better friend in the White House than your president, Donald J. Trump."

Continue Reading

Facebook

Pearl Harbor veteran interred on sunken USS Arizona

Published

on

Will Smith still feels "emotional" about homelessness years after playing a destitute man in one of his most acclaimed film roles, the Hollywood star has told charity campaigners braving a fierce New York winter night to sleep rough.

Hundreds of people had gathered in Times Square on Saturday, rugged up and ready to bunk down in freezing temperatures, in a campaign to raise funds for what organizers said was record homelessness globally.

Smith told the crowd that his Oscar-nominated role in "The Pursuit of Happyness" -- a 2007 biopic of a salesman forced to live on the streets of San Francisco with his young son -- was a "life-changing experience" that had allowed him to understand the misery of poverty.

Continue Reading
 

Facebook

‘Emotional’ Will Smith campaigns against homelessness in New York

Published

on

Will Smith still feels "emotional" about homelessness years after playing a destitute man in one of his most acclaimed film roles, the Hollywood star has told charity campaigners braving a fierce New York winter night to sleep rough.

Hundreds of people had gathered in Times Square on Saturday, rugged up and ready to bunk down in freezing temperatures, in a campaign to raise funds for what organizers said was record homelessness globally.

Smith told the crowd that his Oscar-nominated role in "The Pursuit of Happyness" -- a 2007 biopic of a salesman forced to live on the streets of San Francisco with his young son -- was a "life-changing experience" that had allowed him to understand the misery of poverty.

Continue Reading