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Trump still privately questions whether Obama’s birth certificate is real: report

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According to a New York Times report, President Donald Trump has recently been heard repeating his “birther” claim about whether or not former President Barack Obama’s birth certificate was real.

“In recent months, [sources] say, Mr. Trump has used closed-door conversations to question the authenticity of President Barack Obama’s birth certificate,” the Times’ Tuesday night report reads. “He has also repeatedly claimed that he lost the popular vote last year because of widespread voter fraud, according to advisers and lawmakers.”

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A senator who spoke on condition of anonymity chuckled as they told the Times about being privy to those recent conversations where “the president revived his doubts” about how authentic Obama’s birth certificate is.

The report also made note of Trump’s recent claims that the “Access: Hollywood” tape where he was heard bragging about grabbing women “by the p*ssy” might be a fake — despite apologizing for it and calling it “locker room talk” last year when the tape was first released. Those close to Trump told The Washington Post that he has taken to bragging that special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into his possible collusion with the Russian government will be ending by the close of the year.

“He creates his own reality and lives in his own reality and tries to bend reality around himself and his own deep narcissistic needs,” Peter Wehner, senior fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center, told the Post.


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Trump rages at Twitter — but the social media outlet fears public opinion more than it fears the president

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In a landmark action, Twitter has for the first time attached independent fact-checking information directly to two tweets from President Donald Trump. The president’s tweets make false claims alleging that wider use of mail in ballots will result in an increase in voter fraud.

This is far from the first time Trump has posted falsehoods on Twitter. But it is the first time the social media company has taken action against his account.

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‘I’m entitled’: Kayleigh McEnany defends her 11 mail-in votes while calling it ‘fraud’ for the masses

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White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany on Thursday faced questions from Fox News about why she had voted by mail 11 times even though President Donald Trump has called absentee ballots a "scam."

McEnany was asked about her voting history after the Tampa Bay Times reported that she had used mail-in voting nearly a dozen times in recent years.

"So why is it OK for you to do it?" Fox News host Ed Henry asked McEnany. "I understand you are traveling, you're in a different city. But how can you really be assured that your votes were counted accurately but when other people do it, it's fraud."

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‘They want their civil war’: Far-right ‘boogaloo’ militants have embedded themselves in the George Floyd protests in Minneapolis

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Young, white men dressed in Hawaiian-style print shirts and body armor, and carrying high-powered rifles have been a notable feature at state capitols, lending an edgy and even sometimes insurrectionary tone to gatherings of conservatives angered by restrictions on businesses and church gatherings during the coronavirus pandemic.

Just as many states are reopening their economies — and taking the wind out of the conservative protests — the boogaloo movement found a new galvanizing cause: the protests in Minneapolis against the police killing of George Floyd.

A new iteration of the militia movement, boogaloo was born out of internet forums for gun enthusiasts that repurposed the 1984 movie Breakin’ 2: Electric Boogaloo as a code for a second civil war, and then modified it into phrases like “big luau” to create an insular community for those in on the joke, with Hawaiian-style shirts functioning as an in-real-life identifier. Boogaloo gained currency as an internet meme over the summer of 2019, when it was adopted by white supremacists in the accelerationist tendency. In January, the movement made the leap from the internet to the streets when a group boogaloo-ers showed up at the Second Amendment rally in Richmond, Va.

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