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Oklahoma soldier could lose custody of his son while deployed overseas

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A Calera, Oklahoma, soldier fears he might lose custody of his son because he’s being deployed overseas.

Oklahoma Army National Guard soldier Richard Solis is being sent to Afghanistan, and a local judge awarded his ex-wife temporary custody, despite losing custody of her son Austin when he was just 2 years old, according to KFOR News.

“He feels hopeless,” said current wife Sara Solis. “You shouldn’t have to worry about performing a duty and then losing your child.”

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She explained that she and her husband have primary custody after the biological mother’s past caused her to lose custody of the child years ago. Their attorney has already begun an appeal process, and the family has said they’re ready to take it all the way to the Supreme Court if they must.

Mr. Solis took to social media, posting from thousands of miles from home to beg for help.

“We’re going to fight to make this right,” his wife said, noting she hasn’t spoken to Austin since last week. Christmas presents still sit under the family tree waiting for him to come home.

The appeal documents explain that the Service Member Civil Relief Act allows service members to assign another person to have temporary custody and visitation rights while the primary parent is deployed. However, Judge Clark Huey of Altus District Court didn’t uphold that law, the family said.

“Just because we’re not biological parents doesn’t mean we don’t deserve to raise kids just because our husbands or wives are serving the country,” Austin’s stepmother said.

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In another Facebook post Tuesday, Sara Solis said that Austin asked his father “to keep fighting for him.” She revealed that Austin was given just two hours to collect his things and be out of his family home to stay with his biological mother.

Read the full post from the family below:

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Watch the full report from KFOR below:


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Navajo Nation got masks from a former Trump official — that ‘are not approved by the FDA’: report

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The Indian Health Service acknowledged on Wednesday that 1 million respirator masks it purchased from a former Trump White House official do not meet Food and Drug Administration standards for “use in healthcare settings by health care providers.”

The IHS statement calls into question why the agency purchased expensive medical gear that it now cannot use as intended. The masks were purchased as part of a frantic agency push to supply Navajo hospitals with desperately needed protective equipment in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic.

ProPublica revealed last week that Zach Fuentes, President Donald Trump’s former deputy chief of staff, formed a company in early April and 11 days later won a $3 million contract with IHS to provide specialized respirator masks to the agency for use in Navajo hospitals. The contract was granted with limited competitive bidding.

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‘There needs to be a prosecution’ of cop who killed George Floyd: CNN guest says ‘call it what it is’

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On CNN Wednesday, criminal defense attorney Joey Jackson walked through why the Minneapolis police officer responsible for George Floyd's suffocation death must be prosecuted.

"Bottom line, question here from looking at this, should the officer face charges?" asked host Erin Burnett.

"Erin, I don't think there is any question about that, and I think if you look at it, under any reasonable measure there needs to be a prosecution," said Jackson. "You know, when you look at issues of excessive force — and I know this comes with a lot of emotion, and it should because of the blatant nature of what occurred. But if you even look at it legally and forget about the emotion, you look and you see, was there an imminent fear that the officer was facing when he had his knee in the neck of Mr. Floyd? And the answer is resoundingly no. You look at the force he used, that is the officer, and you say is it proportionate to whatever threat was posed? The answer is no, you don't see any threat. You see a person detained and really not resisting at all."

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Police clash with George Floyd protesters in Minneapolis for second straight day

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On Wednesday, protests against the police killing of George Floyd continued — and once again, police and demonstrators clashed, with authorities using chemical agents to attempt to deter the crowds.

Protestors move further back into street after police shoot some kind of deterrent pic.twitter.com/yrvqziOMbD

— christine nguyen (@xinewin) May 27, 2020

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