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Obstruction? Bannon lawyer relayed questions to Trump White House during testimony — and they told him to not answer

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The attorney for former White House political strategist Steve Bannon relayed the questions his client was being asked during Tuesday’s testimony before the House Intelligence Committee back to officials at the Trump White House — and he was instructed to not answer them.

The Associated Press reports that Bannon’s attorney, Bill Burk, “relayed questions, in real time” to the Trump White House, who in turn instructed Bannon to not answer any questions about things that happened both during the presidential transition in late 2016, or about his time within the White House.

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“It’s unclear who Burck communicated with or whether it was top White House lawyer Don McGahn,” the AP writes. “Burck is also representing McGahn in special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into contacts between the Trump campaign and Russia.”

Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA) claimed Tuesday that Bannon’s attorney contacted the White House after the committee subpoenaed him.

“This was effectively a gag order by the White House,” Schiff said.

In a related story, sources tell CNBC that the White House believed that it had a deal with Congressional investigators to limit the scope of questioning to Bannon to only events that took place during the 2016 presidential campaign — not during the transition or the Trump presidency.

“We said ‘Hey, hey, pump the brakes,'” one White House official said. “We said to Bannon, ‘Don’t answer those questions because we haven’t agreed to that scope under the process.'”

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Navajo Nation got masks from a former Trump official — that ‘are not approved by the FDA’: report

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The Indian Health Service acknowledged on Wednesday that 1 million respirator masks it purchased from a former Trump White House official do not meet Food and Drug Administration standards for “use in healthcare settings by health care providers.”

The IHS statement calls into question why the agency purchased expensive medical gear that it now cannot use as intended. The masks were purchased as part of a frantic agency push to supply Navajo hospitals with desperately needed protective equipment in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic.

ProPublica revealed last week that Zach Fuentes, President Donald Trump’s former deputy chief of staff, formed a company in early April and 11 days later won a $3 million contract with IHS to provide specialized respirator masks to the agency for use in Navajo hospitals. The contract was granted with limited competitive bidding.

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Police clash with George Floyd protesters in Minneapolis for second straight day

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On Wednesday, protests against the police killing of George Floyd continued — and once again, police and demonstrators clashed, with authorities using chemical agents to attempt to deter the crowds.

Protestors move further back into street after police shoot some kind of deterrent pic.twitter.com/yrvqziOMbD

— christine nguyen (@xinewin) May 27, 2020

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Texas Supreme Court triggers outrage by denying mail-in ballots to at-risk voters: ‘Brazen and corrupt’

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On Wednesday, the GOP-dominated Supreme Court of Texas ruled that voters cannot claim risk of coronavirus infection as a "disability" under Texas' absentee ballot eligibility law.

The decision triggered outrage immediately on social media, with some commenters noting that the justices themselves issued this decision remotely to keep themselves safe. Others noted that four of the justices themselves are up for re-election, and thus their own candidacies stand to be affected by the ruling.

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