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Trump to allow ‘outrageous’ gold rush-style grab of public lands to begin in less than 48 hours

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Despite protests from conservationists, local tribe leaders, Democratic lawmakers, and even the United Nations’ expert on indigenous rights, at 6am on Friday the Trump administration will allow citizens and companies to start staking claims on sections of the Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante national monuments in Utah so the new stakeholders can conduct hard rock mining on the formerly protected lands.

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“It is outrageous to witness the dismantling of the Bears Ears national monument, in what constitutes a serious attack on indigenous peoples’ rights in the United States,” said Victoria Tauli-Corpuz, UN Special Rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples.

Tauli-Corpuz noted that the previous administration’s decision to create the monument “protected thousands of sacred sites which are central to the preservation of regional Native culture,” and warned President Donald Trump’s December decision to reduce Bears Ears’ area by about 85 percent “exposes thousands of acres of sacred lands and archaeological sites to the threats of desecration, contamination, and permanent destruction.”

Critics have turned to social media to denounce the “modern land run.”

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In response to the attacks on public lands and a proposal from Rep. John Curtis (R-Utah) that purports to give management control of the remaining land to indigenous leaders—who say the measure “is tribal in name only”—a group of Democratic senators has introduced a bill to fight back against Trump and Republicans in Congress:

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In spite of widespread opposition, the Trump administration’s Bureau of Land Management (BLM) plans to move forward with allowing stakeholders to claim plots of land on Friday, and has determined the process will be governed by the General Mining Law of 1872, which covers mining for metals such as copper, gold, silver, and uranium (but not coal and petroleum).

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“The process for staking a claim remains much as it did during the Gold Rush,” Reuters reports:

A prospector hammers four poles into the ground corresponding to the four points of a parcel that can be as big as 20 acres, and attaches a written description of the claim onto one of them. A prospector then has 30 days to record the claim at the local BLM office….

The costs of claiming are low: a $212 filing fee, and an annual maintenance fee of $150. Unlike laws governing petroleum extraction, there are no environmental guidelines specific to hard rock mining, and no requirement to pay a royalty. The claims provide prospectors mineral rights but not ownership of the land.

Lauren Pagel, the policy director of the nonprofit Earthworks, criticized the law as outdated, telling Reuters, “It’s really the last law still on the books from that Manifest Destiny era encouraging a resources free-for-all.”

This article was originally published at Common Dreams

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2020 Election

Trump has ‘confused’ his own voters about mail-in ballots — and GOP fears ‘turnout crisis’: report

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President Donald Trump's frequent attacks on mail-in voting have made his own voters far less likely to take advantage of filing absentee ballots -- and the Washington Post reports that GOP operatives fear it could create a "turnout crisis."

Alabama Secretary of State John Merrill tells the Post that he recently met with a group of Republican voters who traditionally send their ballots through the mail, but were now reluctant to do so thanks to the president's regular attacks on the system.

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2020 Election

Trump’s ‘craziness’ is scaring off exhausted voters in the Rust Belt states: columnist

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In a column for the conservative Bulwark, political observer Daniel McGraw said voters in a key region between Pennsylvania and Ohio have had enough of the chaos in the Donald Trump's White House and his failure to bring the jobs he promised them in 2016.

As McGraw points out, the region along the border encompassing Erie, Crawford, Mercer, Lawrence and Beaver counties in Pennsylvania was a solid Democratic region until Trump came along. Writing that candidate Trump swept into the area in 2016 with rallies where he promised jobs and better times ahead McGraw stated that Trump's pitch was well-received and local voters turned out for him.

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‘Deborah took the bait & hit us!’ Trump lashes out at Birx for delivering bad news about the virus

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President Donald Trump stepped into the dispute between House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) and Dr. Deborah Birx.

The White House coronavirus task force coordinator warned Sunday that the U.S. was in a "new phase" of the pandemic, as Pelosi escalated her attacks on the senior scientist.

"So Crazy Nancy Pelosi said horrible things about Dr. Deborah Birx, going after her because she was too positive on the very good job we are doing on combatting the China Virus, including Vaccines & Therapeutics," Trump tweeted. "In order to counter Nancy, Deborah took the bait & hit us. Pathetic!"

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