Quantcast
Connect with us

GOP strategist says Trump is responsible for putting Texas in play with ‘political segregation’

Published

on

Republican strategist Elise Jordan identified President Donald Trump’s “political segregation” as a leading factor driving the revival of Democrats in Texas during a primary election day appearance with MSNBC’s Katy Tur.

“Voters in the lone star state are heading to polls for the first primaries of the much-anticipated 2018 midterm election,” Tur noted. “Nearly 50,000 more Democrats than Republicans voted early.”

ADVERTISEMENT

“The question today is whether they’ll maintain that enthusiasm advantage or whether the numbers will end up narrowing,” Tur noted.

Tur played an clip of NBC News correspondent Vaughn Hillyard talking to a voter in Wimberley, Texas.

“What I think about the White House is it’s an extremely inexperienced White house and there is a complete lack of control,” the voter explained.

“Not all Republicans in Texas necessarily look at this White House in a fond way?” Hillyard asked.

ADVERTISEMENT

“That’s correct, they don’t, they see that,” the voter answered. “It is almost out of control in some regards.”

“Jumping off from there and talking about the Republicans who might not be so happy about Donald Trump down in the lone star state, there were a lot of Republicans in 2016, moderate republicans who found Donald Trump to be abhorrent, but they still went and voted for him,” Tur noted. “Is the last year and a half, a little bit over year of the administration, going to … actually change their vote, instead of just make them say that they’re going to change their vote?”

“Considering what’s happening in Texas right now, consider that Donald Trump won Texas by about that same margin that he won in Ohio, single digits,” Foley explained. “He is not a beloved figure, necessarily, the way that a Republican normally would be in Texas.”

ADVERTISEMENT

“I do not support political strategies that are based on segregation and that’s essentially what Donald Trump is pursuing right now, political segregation,” Foley noted. “And if we continue to try to politically segregate the vote with incendiary language that has been used towards different populations in the country, I think that that’s just not a viable long-term strategy.”

Watch:

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Nagasaki marks 75 years since atomic bombing

Published

on

The Japanese city of Nagasaki on Sunday commemorated the 75th anniversary of its destruction by a US atomic bomb, with its mayor and the head of the United Nations warning against a nuclear arms race.

Nagasaki was flattened in an atomic inferno three days after Hiroshima -- twin nuclear attacks that rang in the nuclear age and gave Japan the bleak distinction of being the only country to be struck by atomic weapons.

Survivors, their relatives and a handful of foreign dignitaries attended a remembrance ceremony in Nagasaki where they called for world peace.

Participants offered a silent prayer at 11:02 am (0202 GMT), the time the second and last nuclear weapon used in wartime was dropped over the city.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Lebanon information minister resigns over Beirut blast

Published

on

Lebanon’s information minister Manal Abdel Samad on Sunday quit in the first government resignation since a deadly port blast killed more than 150 people and destroyed swathes of Beirut.

?After the enormous Beirut catastrophe, I announce my resignation from government,? she said in a statement carried by local media, apologising to the Lebanese public for failing them.

A number of MPs also submitted their resignations a day earlier due to the explosions.

On Saturday afternoon, thousands took to streets in downtown Beirut in anti-government protests that demand the overhaul of the political system, days after massive explosions.

Continue Reading
 

2020 Election

Trump admitted on live TV he will ‘terminate’ Social Security and Medicare if reelected in November

Published

on

President Donald Trump on Saturday afternoon openly vowed to permanently "terminate" the funding mechanism for both Social Security and Medicare if reelected in November—an admission that was seized upon by defenders of the popular safety net programs who have been warning for months that the administration's threat to suspend the payroll tax in the name of economic relief during the Covid-19 pandemic was really a backdoor sabotage effort.

Announcing and then signing a series of legally dubious executive orders, including an effort to slash the emergency federal unemployment boost by $200 from the $600 previously implemented by Democrats, Trump touted his order for a payroll tax "holiday"—which experts noted would later have to be paid back—but said if he won in November that such a cut would become permanent.

Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage. Help us deliver it. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image