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Trump should be ‘smarter’ on steel tariffs: US Speaker Ryan

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President Donald Trump should take “surgical” action against countries that dump steel and aluminum in US markets rather than follow through on a risky threat of global tariffs, Congress’s top Republican said Tuesday.

Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, leading a sharp break with the president, said that while there was “clearly abuse occurring,” particularly by China, protectionist measures could have the “unintended consequences” of a trade war.

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“I think the smarter way to go is to make it more surgical and more targeted” than broad tariffs, Ryan told reporters.

Trump triggered global alarm last week when he announced he would sign off on measures designed to protect US producers, and defiantly swatted back at critics by saying trade wars are “good, and easy to win.”

Ryan said such action would make the United States “more prone to retaliation.”

“And so what we’re encouraging the administration to do is to focus on what is clearly a legitimate problem, and to be more surgical in its approach, so that we can go after the true abusers without creating any kind of unintended consequences or collateral damage.”

Ryan said he has had multiple conversations with Trump about the issue, and that while he would not characterize the discussions, he said the president “knows our view.”

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Ryan’s comments come a day after he publicly split with the president on the tariffs.

“We are extremely worried about the consequences of a trade war and are urging the White House to not advance with this plan,” AshLee Strong, a Ryan spokeswoman, said in a statement Monday.

Several other congressional Republicans were urging Trump to abandon his plan to slap a new import tax of 25 percent on steel and 10 percent on aluminum.

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“We have concerns,” Senate Foreign Relations Committee chairman Bob Corker said of the effects the tariffs could have on allies like Canada and Mexico.


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Devin Nunes ‘needs a hug’: Impeachment viewers ridicule Republicans as their witnesses’ testimony backfires

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Reps. Devin Nunes (R-CA) and Micahel Turner (R-OH) complained in the open House Intelligence Committee Tuesday that the hearings were going longer and Democrats were adding time to the 45 minutes they'd reserved for each side to question witnesses.

In past hearings run by Republicans, the questioning was cut significantly short, where Democrats are allowing for as many minutes as needed for both sides. It's unknown why Nunes was so concerned about the time, he claimed that people were turning off their televisions, which is contrary to what has been reported about the ratings for the hearings, which have doubled.

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Trump pardoned Edward Gallagher for war crimes — but the Navy is still ousting him from the SEALs: report

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The acceptability of committing war crimes while in uniform is putting the U.S. Navy on a collision course with President Donald Trump's White House.

"The Navy SEAL at the center of a high-profile war crimes case has been ordered to appear before Navy leaders Wednesday morning, and is expected to be notified that the Navy intends to oust him from the elite commando force," The New York Times reported Tuesday, citing "two Navy officials."

"The move could put the SEAL commander, Rear Adm. Collin Green, in direct conflict with President Trump, who last week cleared the sailor, Chief Petty Officer Edward Gallagher, of any judicial punishment in the war crimes case. Military leaders opposed that action as well as Mr. Trump’s pardons of two soldiers involved in other murder cases," the newspaper reported.

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Climate groups applaud Gavin Newsom’s temporary fracking ban in California, but say other ‘critical next steps’ still needed

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"Relentless organizing" by climate action groups across California forced the governor to call for a moratorium on fracking, 350.org co-founder Bill McKibben said.

Anti-fracking advocates were cautiously optimistic Tuesday after California Gov. Gavin Newsom announced a moratorium on fracking in the state and new steps to mitigate the disastrous public health effects that extractive industries have on communities.

Author and 350.org co-founder Bill McKibben credited "relentless organizing" with pressuring the Democratic governor to ban—at least temporarily—the high-pressure steam injection central to the fracking process and pledge to reverse the increase in drilling permits that's taken place under Newsom's administration.

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