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Trump’s failed voter fraud ‘czar’ Kobach plans on having a hate group member testify on his behalf in court

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Next week, Kansas Secretary of State and erstwhile heed of the Trump administration’s failed “electoral integrity” commission Kris Kobach will go to federal court to defend his state’s extreme voter ID law. He plans on bringing with him a team of “experts,” many of whom propose voter fraud conspiracy theories — and one of whom is a member of a known hate group.

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Talking Points Memo on Thursday published a rundown of Kobach’s star witnesses, which includes Steve Camarota, the research director for the hard-right Center for Immigration Studies that has been categorized by the Southern Poverty Law Center as a hate group for their “constant stream of fear-mongering misinformation about Latino immigrants.” One of their founders, John Talton, is a known eugenicist who believes the U.S. must retain its “European-American majority” to thrive.

During Kobach’s trial, Camerota will not be testifying about immigration at all. Instead, court documents show he’ll be there to prove “no evidence that the proof of citizenship requirement adversely impacts the registration or participation rates of U.S. citizens in Kansas.”

Among the other experts Kobach assembled is Hans von Spakovsky, another member of the failed election integrity commission who once emailed Attorney General Jeff Sessions saying Democrats and “mainstream Republican officials” should not be allowed to serve on it. He also tapped Old Dominion University professor Jesse Richmon, who wrote a Washington Post editorial claiming undocumented immigrants swung the vote for Barack Obama in North Carolina in 2008 that resulted in three rebuttals in the Post alone.


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US economy faces long-lasting damage from Trump’s trade war: fed official

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The trade conflict of the past two years likely left a mark on the US economy, even with the recent agreement to defuse the situation, a Federal Reserve official said Monday.

The outbreak of the new coronavirus in China adds another risk factor to the outlook, which otherwise seemed poised to provide steady growth, said Loretta Mester, president of the Federal Reserve's regional bank in Cleveland.

"At this point, it is difficult to assess the magnitude of the economic effects, but this new source of uncertainty is something I will be carefully monitoring," she said of the epidemic.

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Amazon’s ‘Hunters’ slammed by Auschwitz Memorial

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Amazon Prime’s new show Hunters was called out by the Auschwitz Memorial on Sunday for “dangerous foolishness and caricature” for creating a scene that is historically inaccurate. The show, which stars Al Pacino, Logan Lerman, Jerrika Hinton and Tiffany Boone, follows a group of Nazi hunters in New York City in 1977. The scene in question takes […] (more…)

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Trump’s latest healthcare push would be a massive gift to Silicon Valley — and could destroy your privacy rights

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The tech industry and Silicon Valley have been lobbying the Trump Administration for policy changes that, they argue, would make it easier for patients in the U.S. to download their medical records onto their smartphones. But this change, journalists Arius Tahir and Adam Cancryn report in Politico, has privacy advocates worried that the privacy of millions of patients could be seriously compromised.

“If proposed policy changes go through, patients would be able to download their health records onto their smartphones and direct it to apps of their choice,” Tahir and Cancryn explain. “But there’s a major privacy pitfall: as soon as those records leave the software system of the doctor or hospital, they are no longer protected by HIPAA, the landmark medical privacy law.”

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