Quantcast
Connect with us

The end of the Trump presidency now looms — here’s why

Published

on

- Commentary

The scandals surrounding President Donald Trump are metastasizing rapidly, much more than anyone would have thought just a few months ago.

The investigation by Robert Mueller, now 11 months in duration, has been accumulating evidence of possible Russian collusion, obstruction of justice, abuse of power, violation of the emoluments clause of the Constitution, and the corruption surrounding many members of the Trump circle, including his own children and his son-in-law, Jared Kushner.

ADVERTISEMENT

But then the Stormy Daniels scandal, and other related shameful episodes involving other women became part of the equation, and the business dealings of Donald Trump in New York State were added to the complicated situation. And now, the seizure of materials and records of Trump personal lawyer Michael Cohen raises the ante on the troubles and turmoil surrounding Donald Trump. At the same time, Trump is without stable advice from his cabinet or others, due to the chaotic nature of a constantly changing set of advisers, and his tendency to “shoot from the hip” not only in tweets, but in constantly evolving views on domestic and foreign policy challenges.

With the midterm congressional elections now less than seven months away, and with the Republicans running scared about potential massive losses, and with more criticism emerging from not only respectable conservatives, but also from some of his own loyalists, Donald Trump’s time in the Presidency seems rapidly coming toward a sudden end.

While Republican members of Congress look unlikely to abandon him before the midterm elections, it could still happen if Donald Trump fires Robert Muller, Rod Rosenstein, Jeff Sessions, and others, a constant threat. New indictments by Mueller, and the possibility of such action by the New York State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman could be in the offing very soon. And if Trump family members were to be indicted, it could put Trump under such pressure that possible resignation, through some form of arranged “deal,” is not beyond imagination. If the Democrats win control of the House of Representatives in November, impeachment action seems highly likely in 2019, although conviction in the US Senate would be nearly impossible.

However, there is a scheduled meeting of right-wing Evangelical leaders with President Trump on June 19, to consider strategy for the midterm elections, as this group is alarmed at the thought that the Trump scandals could cost them the advancement of their religious agenda. It could be, two months from now, that gloom and doom will set in, and cause these pastors and ministers and their allies to consider Trump’s resignation as preferable, as it would bring a “true believer,” Vice President Mike Pence, to the Presidency.

One would think behind the scenes that many congressional Republicans and conservatives would clearly prefer Pence, who is religiously devout, and does not have the drama and controversy that Donald Trump constantly presents. With Pence, the right-wing would not lose, but instead gain a great deal of comfort. This makes it conceivable that we’ll see a repeat of history. When Richard Nixon proved toxic in July 1974 a delegation of congressional Republicans marched to the White House to let him know his base of support on Capitol Hill had collapsed.

ADVERTISEMENT

No matter what the future scenario, America is in a constitutional crisis of greater proportions than Watergate, and with the attendant danger of a Great Recession or a third World War, caused by a mentally unstable and highly stressed President. So while it now seems likely that Trump will outlast the 492 days of President Zachary Taylor, to be reached on May 27, 2018, once thought by this scholar to be the end point of the Trump Presidency, it seems evident that Trump will leave office before the 4th shortest Presidency, that of Warren G. Harding from 1921-1923, a total of 881 days. This would be Thursday, June 20, 2019.

So with 15 months down in the Trump Presidency, the chance of his leaving in the next 14 months at the most is on the horizon.

Ronald L. Feinman is the author of Assassinations, Threats, and the American Presidency: From Andrew Jackson to Barack Obama (Rowman Littlefield Publishers, August 2015). A paperback edition is now available.

ADVERTISEMENT

This article was originally published at History News Network

Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Trump’s new chief of staff Mark Meadows already facing damaging leaks from White House staffers

Published

on

President Donald Trump's new White House chief of staff is already in hot water after just a couple of weeks on the job.

Mark Meadows, who resigned from Congress in late March to begin work in the White House, quickly pushed out legislative liaison Mike McKenna and then replaced press secretary Stephanie Grisham -- and other aides could soon be on their way out, reported Bloomberg.

The North Carolina Republican has also ruffled feathers by calling Republican governors who have resisted issuing stay-at-home orders and asking them to do so immediately, according to two people familiar with the calls.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Trump’s hopes for a rapid economic recovery are likely a pipe dream: economists

Published

on

President Donald Trump is hoping to reopen the American economy in May and quickly get back to the low unemployment rates that he used to justify his claim that he'd created the "best economy" in history.

However, economists who spoke with Vox think that Trump's vision of a rapid V-shaped economic recovery amid the COVID-19 pandemic are simply a pipe dream.

"The very best case scenario is we rapidly bounce back and we get close to something where we were before," said Jesse Edgerton, an economist at JPMorgan. "Personally, I think that’s highly unlikely. The shock from the virus is going to trigger a broader economy-wide recession."

Continue Reading
 

2020 Election

Trump tells 10,000 religious leaders they ‘have to’ help him get re-elected: ‘We have to have victory’

Published

on

President Donald Trump in a private conference call on Wednesday with 10,000 leaders from his most-devoted base, the religious right, in the middle of a global pandemic, urged them to help him win re-election.

“We have a very, very powerful year coming up because you know what lies ahead,” Trump told the faith leaders, as NBC News reported. “And we have to do it. People of faith have to do it. We have to have victory.”

Rev. Johnnie Moore, a member of Trump’s religious right inner circle, says both the President and Vice President were on the call, which presumably was made from the Oval Office.

Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage. Help us deliver it. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image