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Kamala Harris grills Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg for deflecting Senate questions: ‘You don’t have answers’

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Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA) and Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg.

Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg was grilled by his own United States senator during a marathon public hearing on Capitol Hill Tuesday.

Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA), the former Attorney General of the most populous state, began by lecturing the billionaire over his failure to answer important questions during hours of testimony.

“I have to tell you, I am concerned about how much Facebook values trust and transparency,” Sen. Harris warned. “During the course of this hearing, these last four hours, you have been asked several critical questions for which you do not have answers.”

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“Those questions have included whether Facebook can track users’ browsing activity even after the user has logged off of Facebook, whether Facebook can track your activity across devices even when you are not logged into Facebook,” she listed. “Who is Facebook’s biggest competition?”

“Facebook, and I’m going to assume you personally as a CEO, became aware in December 2015 that Dr. Kogan and Cambridge Analytica misappropriated data from 87 million users,” the former prosecutor noted. “That is 27 months ago, you became aware 27 months ago.”

“A decision was made not to notify the users,” Harris continued. “Were you part of a discussion that … resulted in a decision not to inform your users?” Harris asked.

“I do not remember a conversation like that,” Zuckerberg replied.

The two went back and forth on an issue.

“Senator, in retrospect, I think we clearly view it as a mistake that we did not inform people,” Zuckerberg admitted. “We did that based on false information, we thought the case was closed and the data was deleted.”

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“There was a decision made not to inform the users, is that correct?” Sen. Harris asked.

“Yes,” Zuckerberg answered. “In retrospect, I think that was a mistake. Knowing what we know now, we should have handled things differently.”

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WATCH: Trump walked out of a 1990 interview with CNN when they asked about his finances

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Long before he became the president, Donald Trump was a business tycoon who had trouble holding onto his money.

As New York Times reporting on the president's personal income tax records has shown, Trump throughout his career would frequently burn through money at a stunning rate throughout the 1990s, at one point reporting adjusted gross losses of nearly $1 billion per year in 1994 and 1995.

The tax records obtained by the Times show that things really started going downhill for Trump in 1990, when he reported a gross net loss of $400 million.

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GOP lawmaker in Tennessee admits to prescribing opioids to his second cousin — who was also his lover

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Tennessee state Sen. Joey Hensley (R) is under investigation by a medical review board for providing opioids to family members, one of which was his second cousin -- who also happened to be his lover, the Tennessean reports.

Hensley, an anti-LGBT ideologue who wrote his state's infamous "Don't Say Gay" bill, admits that he prescribed drugs for his relatives, but says he's the only doctor in town.

“There are not many people in the county who haven’t been to see Dr. Hensley, and she was one of them,” defense attorney David Steed said, adding, “Half of the county are Hensleys. Everyone there knows everyone. There were multiple relationships and the physician-patient relationship was only one and somewhat incidental to the others.”

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2020 Election

West Virginia voter: ‘I’ll probably vote for Donald Trump’ because ‘he keeps the people to the TV set’

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A group of West Virginia voters explained their voting choices to MSNBC on Monday.

"I don't have TV, I don't have internet," one woman said. "I'm pretty far behind. And I bet you a lot of around here are because we're poor. I don't know nothing about Joe [Biden]. I ain't never heard nothing about him at all. Donald Trump, I know a little bit about him because of the past couple of years."

"I'll probably vote for Donald Trump," Jeff Kibbey told MSNBC. "He keeps the people to the TV set."

"One, Trump is good," Francis Senter insisted. "Biden -- however you pronounce his name -- is good too. But like I say, I can't judge either one of them. It's the same community it ain't never going to change because if it was going to change it wouldn't look like this right here."

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