Quantcast
Connect with us

‘You create a killing field’: Security expert destroys the NRA-supported idea of schools with one door

Published

on

Is the solution to school shootings to retrofit American schools so they have a single entrance and exit?

The NRA and Texas’ Lieutenant Governor Dan Patrick both think so, with Patrick blaming too many doors for the shooting at a high school in Santa Fe which killed 10.

“Maybe we need to design schools like other infrastructure where you can only go in and out one door,” Patrick told Fox News. “That might mean changing the way we think about school kids don’t come all at one time but staggered.”

ADVERTISEMENT

But what if a shooter neutralized the security force at that one entrance? Couldn’t they then possibly shoot hundreds of trapped people?

The Washington Post interviewed three security experts about the single-door plan. Arnette F. Heintze of Chicago-based Hillard Heinze the security firm said this is a terrible idea.

“You can’t have one exit and entrance for 1,400 people,” Heintze said. “Then you create a killing field for someone.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Heintze said that better security starts with identifying threats.

“What I’d hate for America to do is get distracted by feeling there is a failure in school security design,” he said. “It’s our society and how we don’t pay attention to signs and behaviors of individuals who are on the path to violence. … You can’t put armed guards at every school entrance in America; it’s not going to happen. It’s educating our society about those behaviors.”

Read what the other experts had to say here.

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Giuliani can’t whine about ‘fair play’ when his boss is denying electoral fairness to the American people: columnist

Published

on

President Donald Trump's attorney Rudy Giuliani has been raging against the impeachment investigation that came about, in large part, due to his own behavior. On Tuesday, he wrote an op-ed for the Wall Street Journal lamenting that the impeachment process is "unprecedented, constitutionally questionable, and an affront to American fair play."

As Danielle Allen wrote for the Washington Post on Wednesday, Giuliani wanting to talk about "fair play" is a rich proposition.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Trump made a ‘huge mistake’ talking to reporters about impeachment: Mueller prosecutor Andrew Weissmann

Published

on

One of former special counsel Robert Mueller's top prosecutors explained on MSNBC how President Donald Trump made a "huge mistake" on Wednesday.

Andrew Weissmann, who is now an MSNBC legal analyst, was interviewed by Chuck Todd on "Meet the Press Daily."

The former federal prosecutor says Trump committed a blunder by denying a call with a Gordon Sondland staffer.

"Why is that?" Todd asked.

"Because he now can’t rebut it," Weissman replied.

"He has now said I don’t remember that phone call. So you’re going to have Sondland testifying to it. You’re going to have a staffer testifying to it," he explained. "If [Trump] doesn’t like their testimony, he’s going to have to say, 'Oh, now I remember that I didn’t say that.'"

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Republicans want Americans to believe Trump cared deeply — about something he never mentioned

Published

on

One of the main points made by Republicans during the House hearings on the impeachment claimed that President Donald Trump cared so deeply about corruption in Ukraine that he was holding back the funding. It wasn't bribery because it was all about legitimate foreign policy, according to Trump and the Republicans in Congress.

Their greatest problem is that Trump has never held back speaking out about something he cared for. As the Washington Post noted, the argument doesn't stand up.

Continue Reading
 
 
Help Raw Story Uncover Injustice. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1 and go ad-free.
close-image