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Spurned advances provoked Texas school shooting: report

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A teenaged boy who shot and killed eight students and two teachers in Texas had been spurned by one of his victims after making aggressive advances, her mother told the Los Angeles Times.

Sadie Rodriguez, the mother of Shana Fisher, 16, told the newspaper that her daughter rejected four months of aggressive advances from accused shooter Dimitrios Pagourtzis, 17, at the Santa Fe high school.

Fisher finally stood up to him and embarrassed him in class, the newspaper quoted her mother as writing in a private message to the Times.

“A week later he opens fire on everyone he didn’t like,” she said. “Shana being the first one.”

Rodriguez could not independently be reached for comment.

If true, it would be the second school shooting in recent months driven by such rejection.

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In March, a 17-year-old Maryland high school student used his father’s gun to shoot and seriously wound a female student with whom he had been in a recently ended relationship, police said.

As the investigation enters its third day on Sunday, no official motive has been announced for the massacre, the fourth-deadliest mass shooting at a U.S. public school in modern history.

Classmates at Santa Fe High School, with some 1,460 students, described the accused shooter, as a quiet loner, who played on the school’s football team. He wore a black trench coat to school in the Texas heat on Friday and opened fire with a pistol and shotgun.

Multiple news accounts depicted him as taunting his victims as he fired, focusing mostly on the arts class room where Fisher was.

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He has provided authorities little information about the shootings, his attorney Nicholas Poehl said, adding: “Honestly because of his emotional state, I don’t have a lot on that.”

Texas’ governor, Jim Abbott, a Republican, told reporters that Pagourtzis obtained firearms from his father, who had likely acquired them legally.

Abbott also said Pagourtzis wanted to commit suicide, citing the suspect’s journals, but did not have the courage to do so.

Pagourtzis’ family said in a statement they were “saddened and dismayed” by the shooting and “as shocked as anyone else” by the events. They said they are cooperating with authorities.

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All schools in Santa Fe will be closed Monday and Tuesday, officials said.

Pagourtzis, who police said has confessed to the shooting, was being held without bond Sunday at a jail in Galveston.

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Trump perfectly trolled with Obama’s stock market success after president warns of crash without him

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Reporting on one of Donald Trump's Saturday tweets -- where the president darkly warned that the stock market would collapse if he is not re-elected -- a financial reporter for Bloomberg slyly pointed out that Trump financial successes since he became president are "middling" -- and that his predecessor was more successful.

According to Bloomberg's Roz Krasny, "President Donald Trump, gearing up for the official start of his 2020 campaign, warned that the U.S. would face an epic stock market crash if he’s not re-elected," noting his tweet stated, "The Trump Economy is setting records, and has a long way up to go....However, if anyone but me takes over in 2020 (I know the competition very well), there will be a Market Crash the likes of which has not been seen before! KEEP AMERICA GREAT."

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Sarah Sanders’ lies were worse than reported — here is how she got away with them

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In her tenure as White House Press Secretary, Sarah Huckabee Sanders became legendary for her ability to lie at the podium.

But according to conservative commentator Andrew Egger, writing for The Bulwark, Sanders' real "success" for the Trump administration did not come from how frequently she lied — it came from the fact that most of her lies were boring.

"Her morose, plodding style and Bartlebyesque refusals to grant reporters a single inch of ground poured cold water on news cycle after news cycle that might otherwise have ignited," wrote Egger. "The downside, of course, was that she lied a lot. But even here she distinguished herself from [predecessor Sean] Spicer, whose sweaty, frantic tall tales—that was the largest audience to ever witness an inauguration, period!—always invited heaps of instant ridicule. Deadpanning her way through boring, misleading briefing after boring, misleading briefing, Sarah Sanders managed to take most of the fun out of calling her out—as much of a victory as Trump could typically hope for, under the circumstances."

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Small donors are rebuilding Notre-Dame as French billionaires delay

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As Notre-Dame holds its first mass Saturday since a devastating fire two months ago, billionaire French donors who pledged hundreds of millions for rebuilding have "yet to pay a penny", a spokesman for the cathedral said.

Instead, the funds paying for clean-up and reconstruction are coming mainly from French and American citizens who donated to church charities like the Friends of Notre-Dame de Paris. Those charities are helping pay the bills and the salaries ofup to 150 workers employed by the cathedral since the April 15 fire destroyed its roof and caused its iconic spire to collapse.

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