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Killing dogs for meat illegal, rules South Korean court

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A South Korean court has ruled the killing of dogs for meat is illegal, in a landmark decision that animal rights activists said Thursday could pave the way to outlawing eating canines.

The meat has long been a part of South Korean cuisine, with about one million dogs believed to be eaten annually.

But consumption has declined as South Koreans increasingly embrace the idea of dogs as man’s best friend rather than livestock, with the practice now something of a taboo among younger generations and pressure from activists mounting.

Even so it remains a legal grey area. Despite no specific ban, authorities have invoked hygiene regulations or animal protection laws that ban cruel slaughter methods to crack down on dog farms and restaurants ahead of international events such as the Pyeongchang Olympics.

Animal rights group Care last year filed complaints against a dog farm operator in Bucheon, accusing him of “killing animals without proper reasons” and violating building and hygiene regulations, and prosecutors later charged him.

He was convicted by the Bucheon City court, which ruled that meat consumption was not a legal reason to kill dogs, and fined three million won ($2,700). He waived his right to appeal.

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Care lawyer Kim Kyung-eun welcomed the ruling — made in April but with details only released this week — telling AFP: “It is very significant in that it is the first court decision that killing dogs for dog meat is illegal itself.”

The precedent “paved the way for outlawing dog meat consumption entirely”, she added.

Care leader Park So-youn said her group was tracking down dog farms and slaughter houses across the country with a view to filing similar complaints against them to judicial authorities.

“Over the past decades, public discourse over dog meat consumption has shifted towards banning it,” she said. “The dog meat industry will take greater heat because of the court ruling.”

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– Barking mad –

A lawmaker from the ruling Democratic Party introduced a bill in parliament this week that would effectively ban killing dogs for meat.

The measure would limit the slaughter of animals for food to species classed as livestock, which does not include canines.

Some 30 activists rallied outside the National Assembly on Thursday, urging it to pass the measure.

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But some South Koreans object to what they describe as cultural double standards.

Dog is usually eaten in the country as a summertime delicacy, with the greasy red meat — invariably boiled for tenderness — believed to increase energy.

AFP / PAK YIUA vendor pulls a trolley with dog meat at the Dongkou market in China’s southern Guangxi, ahead of this month’s Yulin dog meat festival. Meanwhile in South Korea, a court has outlawed the killing of dogs for meat in a landmark ruling

A survey last year found that 70 percent of South Koreans do not eat dogs, but only about 40 percent believe the practice should be banned.

Similar debates have emerged in other Asian nations where dogs are eaten.

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China’s most notorious dog meat festival in the southwestern town of Yulin has continued to draw crowds despite international outrage.

The Bucheon court decision sparked angry protests from dog farmers, whose premises usually double as slaughter houses as the government does not license abattoirs to kill dogs.

“This is outrageous. We can’t accept the ruling that killing of dogs for dog meat consumption amounts to killing animals on a whim,” Cho Hwan-ro, a representative from an association of dog farms, said on YTN television.

There are some 17,000 dog farms across the country, Cho said, calling for the government to explicitly legalise dog meat consumption and license dog slaughter houses. “Otherwise, we’ll fight to the end,” he added.

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“Dogs for eating and dogs as pets must be separated,” he said, adding they were different breeds, fed differently and raised for different purposes.

“Cows, pigs, chickens and ducks are all raised to be consumed and why not dogs?” he said

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BUSTED: Trump’s DOJ intervened to keep Paul Manafort from being imprisoned at Rikers Island

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President Donald Trump's Department of Justice intervened to keep his former campaign chairman out of jail, The New York Times reported Monday.

Manafort had been expected to be moved to the Rikers Island jail complex.

"But last week, Manhattan prosecutors were surprised to receive a letter from the second-highest law enforcement official in the country inquiring about Mr. Manafort’s case. The letter, from Jeffrey A. Rosen, Attorney General William P. Barr’s new top deputy, indicated that he was monitoring where Mr. Manafort would be held in New York," the newspaper reported.

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Four years ago this week: Trump’s escalator ride and the Charleston shooting. It’s not a coincidence

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It was four years ago (plus one day) when Donald Trump descended his golden elevator at Trump Tower and announced to the world that he was running for president to make America great again. It was a memorable day, although I don't think anyone believed at the time it would be more than a bizarre blip in presidential campaign history.

It was a patented Trumpian spectacle, ridiculous and over the top. Needless to say, the speech itself was offensive and absurd. He called Mexicans rapists and criminals, bragged about his allegedly enormous wealth and said that the U.S. had never beaten China and Japan at anything. He lied about the crowd size and insulted the press. In other words, it was the template for all the speeches that were to come, throughout his campaign and his presidency.

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‘They don’t trust him’: Ex-CIA operative says intel officials’ efforts to conceal information from Trump is ‘stunning’

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On Monday, former CIA officer Bob Baer told CNN's Erin Burnett that he had never heard of a situation before like the new reports that intelligence officials concealed information from President Donald Trump about efforts to plant malware in the Russian power grid.

"It is pretty stunning, the reporting here that they didn't tell him everything that they were doing because they were worried that he would tell the Russians themselves or make them stop doing it," said Burnett. "Could you imagine a scenario like this?"

"Never," said Baer. "In all my years in intelligence and around it and studying it and the rest, I have never heard of an operation intentionally kept away from the president. It just doesn't happen, ever. I know of no circumstances, and I'm talking 50, 60 years, that this has ever occurred."

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