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‘We need to disband the entire Republican Party’: Ann Coulter flattens her own party

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Conservative long-time Republican commentator Ann Coulter made a dramatic turn when she decided President Donald Trump wasn’t keeping his promises on immigration. Now, Coulter is turning against the GOP entirely.

During a panel discussion on Fox News’ Steve Hilton’s Sunday show, Coulter and former Rep. Jason Chaffetz (R-UT) both decided they were done with the Republican Party.

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“You see that with the left and the elite conservatives in the Republican Party that don’t want an honest dialogue about the successes of this president,” said Chaffetz. “Instead of joining together and moving forward with specific goals to restore getting wins in the midterms, they are being disruptive in a haphazard way. ”

Coulter took her disdain to a deeper level.

“I completely agree with you that we need to disband the official Republican Party. That was the point you were making and I completely agree. I’m sorry Representative,” Coulter said, turning to Chaffetz.

“Hey, I quit, so,” Chaffetz said with a chuckle.

“Everything you said is right,” Coulter said to Hilton. “It kind of depresses me because I feel like we are at the end of the campaign, because, you are right, [Trump] appealed to the people. This was the first time I hated the Republican Party. I mean, I’ve been a Republican my entire life, they were exposed as a uni-party. You’re right. Indistinguishable from the Democrats. It’s for the rich. It’s for the donors. Since he’s been president. I know he’s up against a lot, but man the swamp has been moving in!:

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She went on to say that it was absurd and she felt like she was living in a nightmare.

Watch the full discussion below:

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Matt Gaetz compared top Florida leaders in history — who were actually respectable

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Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL) made news Thursday when he went after former Vice President Joe Biden's son for past drug problems. While many families are fighting the drug war, Gaetz family faced a problem when he was pulled over by police just two years before running for office in Florida.

"I don’t want to make light of anybody’s substance abuse issues,” Gaetz said Thursday before making light of the younger Biden's substance abuse issues.

Rep. Hank Johnson (D-GA) said it was the perfect example of the "pot calling the kettle black."

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Trump’s mental derangement suggests he experienced abuse in childhood: psychiatrist

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President Donald Trump's outlandish behavior is the result of childhood trauma that he has not worked through, "Couples Therapy" star Dr. Jenn Mann told TMZ.

"One, he's someone who gets triggered easily," she explained. "Two, he has terrible impulse control, very poor impulse control. Developmentally, his ability to control his impulses ... he's almost like a young child."

"Take me back to the childhood, what do you think caused this?" the reporter asked. "What caused -- this?"

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Judge orders State Department to expand search for records of Rudy Giuliani and Mike Pompeo communications

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This Friday, a federal judge ordered the State Department to ramp up its search for records detailing communications in regards to Ukraine between Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and President Trump’s personal lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, McClatchy reports.

Judge Christopher Cooper of the United States District Court for the District of Columbia wants the State Department to expand on its release last month of records documenting contact between the two.

Cooper gave the the State Department until January 8 to release all records documenting "emails, text messages, call logs and scheduled meetings on Ukraine policy that were dated until October 18," adding that the department had “not adequately justified why its Executive Secretariat used a cut-off date," according to McClatchy.

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