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Trump administration considers tent cities for immigrant children

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Texas may soon be the site of tent cities that will house immigrant children separated from their parents as a result of the Trump administration’s “zero tolerance” policy, McClatchy reported Tuesday.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is eyeing Fort Bliss, an Army base close to El Paso, as a potential location for a cluster of temporary shelters that could house between 1,000 and 5,000 children, McClatchy reported. The department is also considering Dyess Air Force Base in Abilene and Goodfellow Air Force Base in San Angelo.

Thousands of immigrant children have been separated from their parents in the wake of the new policy, which U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced in April. The policy requires immigration authorities to prosecute adults who enter the country illegally seeking asylum, while children are placed in shelters or with families. The tent city proposal is the Department of Health and Human Services’ latest idea for housing the growing number of children under their care, who are quickly filling shelters.

The department did not immediately respond to an emailed request for comment.

U.S. Rep. Beto O’Rourke, a Democrat who represents Fort Bliss, could not confirm the report late Monday afternoon.

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“We have nothing confirmed about where or if military bases will be used for certain,” he said. “But, I first and foremost am opposed to this policy of family separation.”

“This is absolutely the wrong thing for our country to be doing, and I would hate to see us continue this,” he added. “The prospect of building tents or using resources at military installations is just wrong.”

O’Rourke, who is running for the U.S. Senate, is a member of the House Armed Services Committee, which oversees military policy.

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Six Democratic state lawmakers from the El Paso area sent a letter Tuesday to Secretary of Homeland Security Kirstjen M. Nielsen and Scott Lloyd, director of the Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of Refugee Resettlement, raising concerns about the tent city idea.

“The clear purpose of military bases is for armed services operations and housing of military personnel, not for housing immigrant children forcibly taken from their parents,” the letter reads.

The lawmakers — state Sen. José Rodríguez and state Reps. Joe PickettMary GonzálezJoe MoodyCésar Blanco and Evelina Ortega — particularly expressed worry that a temporary shelter at a military base could resemble a detention center, which could harm the children’s mental health.

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Earlier on Tuesday, the lawmakers gathered at the federal courthouse in the border city to decry the pending move and urged the Department of Homeland Security to reconsider its policies.

“Military bases should be used for armed services — I know [because] I served there,” said Blanco, a Navy veteran who trained at Fort Bliss. “We’re concerned that temporary ORR shelters at military bases may resemble baby jails and detention centers.”

Moody and González said they would do whatever was in their power as state lawmakers to make sure that the facility at Fort Bliss is adhering to current regulations that address child detention.

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“Anytime that you’re housing children, your main concern has to be how are they being cared for, are you tending to the medical needs, their emotional needs,” Moody said. “And so, if we’re going to take that task on, is a military installation the best environment for that?”

When reminded that the Department of Homeland Security under President Barack Obama housed immigrant children at Lackland Airforce Base in San Antonio, Moody said he felt the same way then.

“It wouldn’t change my opinion one way or the other,” he said.

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BY CLAIRE PARKER AND JULIÁN AGUILAR, THE TEXAS TRIBUNE


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Trump drops swear word in North Carolina — before whining he has ‘no friends’ as president

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In a story about how great he is, President Donald Trump told his North Carolina rally audience on Wednesday that a "business person" he knows always hated him. But he's doing well now anyway because of the president's policies.

"He came up to me and I said, 'How are you doing?' Very warm, you know. 'Hey, how are you doing. Let’s get out of here,'" Trump recalled.

"And he said, 'I’m doing good, you are doing good.' I said, 'Yeah.' I said, 'You know, you don’t like me and I don’t like you, I never have liked you, and you have never liked me. But you are going to support me because you are a rich guy, and if you don’t support me, you are going to be so Goddamn poor, you are not going to believe it.'"

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‘It’s so un-American’: Internet scorches Trump supporters for racist chants of ‘Send her back!’

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The ignoble highlight of President Donald Trump's rally in Greenville, North Carolina on Wednesday was when his fans doubled down on his racist attacks on four Democratic congresswomen of color and targeted Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-MN), chanting "Send her back! Send her back!"

Political commentators of all stripes were gobsmacked by the crowd's naked racism — and buried them in condemnation:

The crowd at Trump’s rally chanting “send her back” after the President viciously and dishonestly attacked Ilhan Omar is one of the most chilling and horrifying things I’ve ever seen in politics.

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Jeffrey Epstein wasn’t even a competent investor: report

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There can be no doubt that high-powered hedge fund manager Jeffrey Epstein would rather the public know him for his prominence and success as an investor than for the allegations of child sex trafficking, for which he has now been indicted and faces life in prison. And there has for years been mystique surrounding Epstein's business — his wealth fund is so exclusive that it reportedly requires a billion dollars up front from clients.

But according to the Dow Jones' periodical Barron's, Epstein may not even be good at that.

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