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Trump aide says Canada’s Trudeau overreacting to trade dispute

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Trade frictions between the United States and Canada are a “family quarrel,” President Donald Trump’s economic adviser said on Sunday, brushing aside concerns expressed by Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau as an overreaction.

The Trump administration said on Thursday it was moving ahead with tariffs on aluminum and steel imports from Canada, Mexico and the European Union, ending a two-month exemption and potentially setting the stage for a trade war with some of America’s top allies.

Trudeau responded on Thursday by calling the tariffs an affront to the longstanding security partnership between Canada and the United States, and Canada announced retaliatory steps.

Trudeau, in an interview aired on Sunday by NBC’s “Meet the Press”, said it was “insulting” to hear the U.S. claim that Canadian steel and aluminum posed a national security threat.

“I think he’s overreacting,” White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow said of Trudeau on the “Fox News Sunday” program.

Kudlow said steel and aluminum tariffs on U.S. allies “may go on for a while” or “they may not,” because the matter is subject to negotiation.

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Trump has been critical of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) with Canada and Mexico, saying it has harmed the United States economically. The three countries are engaged in renegotiation talks.

Trump said on Friday he might prefer to end NAFTA in favor of separate bilateral agreements with the two U.S. neighbors.

Trudeau is hosting a June 8-9 summit of Group of Seven leaders, including Trump, in the Quebec region of Charlevoix.

Kudlow said Trump had been responding to “several decades of trade abuses” with the tariffs, but noted that the White House announcement said the United States still would welcome good-faith negotiations.

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“And that’s why I regard this as more of a family quarrel. This is a trade dispute, if you will. It can be solved if people work together,” Kudlow said. “To say that it is an attack on Canada is not right.”

In the NBC interview, Trudeau said Canada would be “lodging complaints against these unfair trade practices.” Canada said on Thursday it will impose retaliatory tariffs on U.S. exports, and challenge the U.S. tariffs under NAFTA and the World Trade Organization (WTO).

Trudeau said Canada won’t be at the table for NAFTA talks if the United States insists on a five-year “sunset” clause, adding that “makes no sense.”

“You don’t sign a trade deal that automatically expires every five years.”

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Trump campaign manager counting on Florida ‘Hispanic outreach’ as president trails in state poll

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In a deep dive into why Donald Trump is so focused on Florida as he begins his re-election campaign, Politico reports that polls show the president is behind in the must-win state and that his campaign manager believes he can salvage the state with multiple Hispanic outreach initiatives.

Noting that the president is kicking off his bid to hang onto the Oval Office in Orlando on Tuesday night, the report states that those close to Trump claim he has an obsession with the state.

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The Supreme Court’s Virginia uranium ruling hints at the limits of federal power

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Virginia has the authority to ban uranium mining under state law, even as the federal government regulates the processing of nuclear fuel under the Atomic Energy Act, the Supreme Court has ruled.

Neil Gorsuch, joined by the court’s longest-serving and newest conservatives – Clarence Thomas and Brett Kavanaugh – rejected the idea that Congress’ plan for nuclear enrichment could override Virginia’s decision to prohibit uranium mining altogether. On that point, these three conservatives were in sync with three of the court’s liberals, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan. This remarkably diverse coalition agreed that the “Commonwealth’s mining ban is not preempted” by federal authority. Chief Justice John Roberts filed a dissent.

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Cops defend tackling and handcuffing 12-year-old boy for roughhousing with his cousin

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Police officers in Grand Rapids, Michigan, have faced an onslaught of criticism after they handcuffed and arrested a 12-year-old black boy, the Associated Press reports.

Officers claimed the boy was being violent, trying to attack a man with a wooden pole. The boy's mother disputes that account. She claims her son was just playing with his cousin.

Carreion Baker told a local news outlet that he wasn't aware that officers were after him, which is why he didn't respond to their commands to stop.

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