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Trump just endorsed a Senate candidate who is linked to notorious white supremacists

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President Donald Trump has just endorsed a white supremacist running for the U.S. Senate. Republican Corey Stewart Tuesday night won the primary in Virginia. He will face Democratic U.S. Senator Tim Kaine.

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Stewart appeared in a February HuffPost article titled, “All The White Supremacists Running For Office In 2018.”

“During his 2017 run for governor, Stewart made several joint appearances with white supremacist Jason Kessler, the organizer of the deadly Charlottesville rally,” HuffPost notes. “After that rally, Stewart chastised his fellow Republicans for criticizing the white nationalists, saying violent people on the left were also to blame for the violence.”

Stewart called Paul Nehlen, a “pro-white” candidate for the U.S. Congress from Wisconsin, his “personal hero,” as The Washington Post reports.

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And Stewart now claims “he regretted attending a news conference about Confederate monuments with Jason Kessler, who later organized a white-nationalist rally in Charlottesville that erupted into violence and led to the death of a 32-year-old woman.”

Stewart, according to the Anti-Defamation League (ADL), “champions the preservation of Confederate monuments in the South, and has defended the ‘heritage’ of the Confederate flag. He referred to his Republican primary opponent a ‘cuckservative.'”

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Heavy.com reports that “Virginia Republican activist Willie Deutsch published a blog post calling out Stewart’s use of ‘cuckservative,’ noting that ‘The term is an accusation by the alt-right of being a race traitor, because supporting tolerance and diversity means weakening the power of ‘White Americans’ (hence, cuckolding yourself). Corey Stewart is explicitly wrapping himself in White Nationalism.”

Indeed, Slate notes that Stewart calls the Confederate battle flag “a symbol of heritage.”

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“It is not a symbol of racism. It is not a symbol of slavery,” Stewart claims.

“I was Trump before Trump was Trump,” Stewart said in May of 2017 during his fail bid for governor. “And the reason I say that is – I’m not trying to be him. I’m not trying to be a mini-Trump. I’ve always been very bold, some would say brash, very direct, and I think that’s what people want.”

He calls Confederate statues “part of our identity,” and refused to denounce the alt-right, white nationalist, and white supremacist “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville that featured marching neo-Nazis.

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“I would say Corey Stewart is a white supremacist,” Harry Wiggins, chairman of the Prince William County Democratic Committee, said last year.

Stewart denies the charge.

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