Quantcast
Connect with us

Trump just endorsed a Senate candidate who is linked to notorious white supremacists

Published

on

- Commentary

President Donald Trump has just endorsed a white supremacist running for the U.S. Senate. Republican Corey Stewart Tuesday night won the primary in Virginia. He will face Democratic U.S. Senator Tim Kaine.

ADVERTISEMENT

Stewart appeared in a February HuffPost article titled, “All The White Supremacists Running For Office In 2018.”

“During his 2017 run for governor, Stewart made several joint appearances with white supremacist Jason Kessler, the organizer of the deadly Charlottesville rally,” HuffPost notes. “After that rally, Stewart chastised his fellow Republicans for criticizing the white nationalists, saying violent people on the left were also to blame for the violence.”

Stewart called Paul Nehlen, a “pro-white” candidate for the U.S. Congress from Wisconsin, his “personal hero,” as The Washington Post reports.

ADVERTISEMENT

And Stewart now claims “he regretted attending a news conference about Confederate monuments with Jason Kessler, who later organized a white-nationalist rally in Charlottesville that erupted into violence and led to the death of a 32-year-old woman.”

Stewart, according to the Anti-Defamation League (ADL), “champions the preservation of Confederate monuments in the South, and has defended the ‘heritage’ of the Confederate flag. He referred to his Republican primary opponent a ‘cuckservative.'”

ADVERTISEMENT

Heavy.com reports that “Virginia Republican activist Willie Deutsch published a blog post calling out Stewart’s use of ‘cuckservative,’ noting that ‘The term is an accusation by the alt-right of being a race traitor, because supporting tolerance and diversity means weakening the power of ‘White Americans’ (hence, cuckolding yourself). Corey Stewart is explicitly wrapping himself in White Nationalism.”

Indeed, Slate notes that Stewart calls the Confederate battle flag “a symbol of heritage.”

ADVERTISEMENT

“It is not a symbol of racism. It is not a symbol of slavery,” Stewart claims.

“I was Trump before Trump was Trump,” Stewart said in May of 2017 during his fail bid for governor. “And the reason I say that is – I’m not trying to be him. I’m not trying to be a mini-Trump. I’ve always been very bold, some would say brash, very direct, and I think that’s what people want.”

He calls Confederate statues “part of our identity,” and refused to denounce the alt-right, white nationalist, and white supremacist “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville that featured marching neo-Nazis.

ADVERTISEMENT

“I would say Corey Stewart is a white supremacist,” Harry Wiggins, chairman of the Prince William County Democratic Committee, said last year.

Stewart denies the charge.


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

The US isn’t in a second wave of coronavirus – the first wave never ended

Published

on

After sustained declines in the number of COVID-19 cases over recent months, restrictions are starting to ease across the United States. Numbers of new cases are falling or stable at low numbers in some states, but they are surging in many others. Overall, the U.S. is experiencing a sharp increase in the number of new cases a day, and by late June, had surpassed the peak rate of spread in early April.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

There’s a hidden economic trendline that is shattering the global trade system

Former U.S. Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers has recently conceded: “In general, economic thinking has privileged efficiency over resilience, and it has been insufficiently concerned with the big downsides of efficiency.” Policy across the globe is therefore moving in a more overtly nationalistic direction to rectify this shortcoming.

COVID-19 has accelerated a process that was well underway before it, spreading beyond U.S.-China-EU trade negotiations and into the world’s 50 largest economies. As much as many defenders of the old order lament this trend, it is as significant a shift as the dawn of the World Trade Organization (WTO) global trade era.

Continue Reading
 

2020 Election

What happens when Trump stops believing he can win reelection?

Published

on

If President Trump seems resigned to losing November’s election, he has good reason. The strategy he is pursuing—and it’s generous to call it a strategy—is premised on the idea that he is going to lose. His own advisers acknowledge that there are very few people who can be persuaded to vote for him, and his aim therefore is to do whatever he can to hold his strong supporters while reducing the overall level of turnout.

Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage. Help us deliver it. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image