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Paul Manafort hid Ukraine income in foreign accounts, US prosecutor says

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Paul Manafort, U.S. President Donald Trump’s former campaign chairman, opened more than 30 bank accounts in three foreign countries to “receive and hide” his income from Ukraine, a federal prosecutor told jurors on Tuesday.

Uzo Asonye, one of the prosecutors in Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia probe, made the comment as part of the prosecution’s opening statement as the trial of Manafort got underway in a Virginia federal court.

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The high-profile trial is the first to arise out of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia probe. Earlier in the day, prosecutors and defense attorneys selected a 12-member jury to weigh Manafort’s fate.

Manafort faces charges that he hid tens of millions of dollars earned in Ukraine in offshore accounts and defrauded banks for loans. Four alternate jurors, three women and one man, also were chosen.

“A man in this courtroom believed the law did not apply to him. Not tax, not banking law,” Asonye told the jury of six men and six women in federal court in Virginia, referring to Manafort.

Manafort, 69, was seated in the courtroom wearing a dark suit, white shirt and tie. U.S. District Judge T.S. Ellis made several jokes during the jury selection process, including about the quality of the lunches jurors will be provided. While many in the courtroom laughed, including Manafort’s lawyers, the defendant himself did not.

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Asonye told jurors the evidence would show Manafort hid “tens of millions of overseas income” to avoid paying taxes. Asonye said the evidence would show he lied to the Internal Revenue Service.

Asonye said Manafort set up more than 30 bank accounts in overseas countries and funneled millions of dollars into them in order to bankroll an extravagant lifestyle. Asonye described how Manafort snapped up expensive real estate in the United States, spent millions of dollars on renovating his properties and more than a half million dollars on “fancy clothes.”

Manafort has pleaded not guilty to all the charges.

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The tax and bank fraud trial represents the first test of Mueller’s ability to win a conviction of a former Trump aide. Three other aides, including Manafort’s longtime business partner Rick Gates, have already pleaded guilty and are cooperating with Mueller’s probe.

Prosecutors are seeking to provide details of Manafort’s work for a pro-Russian political party in Ukraine, raising the possibility that new information about his Russian connections could emerge. Manafort has filed a motion to have details of that work excluded from trial.

Manafort faces 18 criminal counts, which center on allegations that he hid much of the $60 million he earned in Ukraine in undisclosed overseas bank accounts and failed to pay taxes on it.

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Prosecutors also accuse him of lying to U.S. banks to obtain real estate loans in a bid to maintain a lavish lifestyle after his client, former pro-Russia Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych, fell from power in 2014 and the money stopped.

Manafort actively conferred with his lawyers during the jury selection process, writing and passing notes. Manafort’s wife, Kathleen, was sitting behind him in the courtroom.

Outside the courthouse, a handful of protesters displayed a life-sized puppet of Trump and held signs saying “Trump won’t do time for you,” “It’s Mueller time,” and “I like your new suit” alongside a photo of Manafort’s mug shot.

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Mueller was appointed by the U.S. Justice Department’s No. 2 official last year to take over an FBI investigation into Russia’s role in the 2016 presidential election and whether there was unlawful coordination between Trump’s campaign and Moscow.

Trump has vacillated between showing sympathy for Manafort and trying to distance himself. Manafort worked on Trump’s presidential campaign for five months and attended a June 2016 Trump Tower meeting with Russians that is a focal point of Mueller’s probe into possible collusion between the campaign and the Kremlin.

A Manafort conviction would give momentum to Mueller, who has indicted or secured guilty pleas from 32 people and three companies since the probe started 14 months ago. An acquittal would support efforts by Trump and his allies to portray the probe as a “witch hunt.” Trump denies any collusion with Russia, and on Tuesday tried to make the case publicly that collusion would not be a crime anyway.

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Prosecutors have said they will not present evidence of collusion at this trial. The Virginia trial will be followed by a second one in Washington in September in which Manafort is charged with money laundering, failing to register as a foreign agent and witness tampering. Manafort has pleaded not guilty to those charges, as well.

Additional reporting by Lawrence Hurley; Editing by John Walcott, Peter Cooney and Will Dunham

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… then let us make a small request. Like you, we here at Raw Story believe in the power of progressive journalism — and we’re investing in investigative reporting as other publications give it the ax. Raw Story readers power David Cay Johnston’s DCReport, which we've expanded to keep watch in Washington. We’ve exposed billionaire tax evasion and uncovered White House efforts to poison our water. We’ve revealed financial scams that prey on veterans, and efforts to harm workers exploited by abusive bosses. We’ve launched a weekly podcast, “We’ve Got Issues,” focused on issues, not tweets. Unlike other news sites, we’ve decided to make our original content free. But we need your support to do what we do.

Raw Story is independent. You won’t find mainstream media bias here. We’re not part of a conglomerate, or a project of venture capital bros. From unflinching coverage of racism, to revealing efforts to erode our rights, Raw Story will continue to expose hypocrisy and harm. Unhinged from corporate overlords, we fight to ensure no one is forgotten.

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