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Stephen Colbert mocks Trump’s speeches as so nutty they ‘ran crazy off a cliff into Coo Coo Canyon’

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Stephen Colbert can’t help but notice several similarities between a man hit over the head with a brick and President Donald Trump.

During the president’s latest rally in Montana, he rambled on about Elton John, organs, records and a series of other musings including a DNA test he wants to “gently” give a female senator.

“And Trump is a real expert on DNA tests. He has performed dozens of them,” Colbert said. He then pretended to be Trump demanding his son Eric take another DNA test to prove they’re actually related.

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The speech was “off script and on crazy,” according to Colbert. “He just ran crazy off a cliff into beautiful Coo Coo Canyon.”

The “Late Show” host couldn’t help but recall  “when people were thinking Trump’s brain might be on the fritz but then his doctor Ronny Jackson said it wasn’t because Trump took a test where he successfully identified a camel. But then Dr. Ronny turned out to be a pill-popping dealer that drank on the job but then we never sent in another non-pilled doctor to test Trump’s brain? Remember that?”

He noted this is the man that is picking the next Supreme Court Justice. Colbert couldn’t help but mock Trump for still being undecided on his choice as of Sunday evening.

“I don’t feel like doing this tonight,” Colbert lamented in his Trump voice. “Why can’t I just nominate Neil Gorsuch again? Give him two votes, double stuffed judge.”

But when it came to Trump’s tweet on Monday morning, Colbert couldn’t help but laugh.

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“What do you mean you have ‘long heard?'” Colbert asked. “Are you still asking people what your job is?”

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Colbert went on to do his own Trump speech pretending to be a person with their own head injury.

Watch Colbert’s full opener below:

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Google tightens political ads policy in effort to stop abuse

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Google on Wednesday updated how it handles political ads as online platforms remain under pressure to avoid being used to spread misleading information intended to influence voters.

The internet company said its rules already ban any advertiser, including those with political messages, from lying in ads. But it is making its policy more clear and adding examples of how that prohibits content such as doctored or manipulated images or video.

"It's against our policies for any advertiser to make a false claim -- whether it's a claim about the price of a chair or a claim that you can vote by text message, that election day is postponed, or that a candidate has died," Google ads product management vice president Scott Spencer said in an online post.

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Pope Francis begins Asia tour with visit to Buddhist temple

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Pope Francis will visit one of Thailand's famed gilded temples Thursday to meet the supreme Buddhist patriarch, on the first full day of his Asian tour aimed at promoting religious harmony.

The 82-year-old pontiff is on his first visit to Buddhist majority Thailand, where he will spend four days before setting off to Japan.

His packed schedule a day after touching down in Bangkok includes a meeting with the king and the prime minister before leading an evening mass expected to draw tens of thousands of people from across Thailand, where just over 0.5 percent of the population is Catholic.

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Hong Kong campus stalemate persists while US congress passes bill of support for democracy protesters

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Hardline Hong Kong protesters held their ground on Thursday in a university besieged for days by police as the US passed a bill lauding the city's pro-democracy movement, setting up a likely clash between Washington and Beijing.

Beijing did not immediately respond to the passage in Washington of the Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act, which voices strong support for the "democratic aspirations of the Hong Kong people."

But China had already threatened retaliation if the bill is signed into law by President Donald Trump, and state-run media warned Thursday the legislation would not prevent Beijing from intervening forcefully to stop the "mess" gripping the financial hub.

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