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Black Alabama woman says she stood her ground against abusive husband — now she’s going to jail

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A black woman who fatally shot her estranged husband is facing potential murder charges, despite the fact that she claims the shooting was done in self defense.

Alabama.com reports that 38-year-old Jacqueline Dixon killed her estranged husband, a 44-year-old man named Carl Omar Dixon, outside of her home in Selma, Alabama.

Dallas County District Attorney Michael Jackson tells Alabama.com that he believed a fight broke out between the couple earlier this week when Carl Omar Dixon accused his wife of cheating on him — and the fight escalated to the point where Jacqueline shot him with a handgun.

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Dixon told police that she shot her husband because he was charging at her aggressively. According to court records, Carl Omar Dixon had a long record of domestic abuse allegations — and Jacqueline successfully obtained a protection from abuse order against her husband in 2016, which also gave her custody of their two children.

To obtain her protection order, Jacqueline testified that her husband had punched her in the face on multiple occasions while also yelling curse words at her.

The state of Alabama has a “stand your ground” law that makes it legal for citizens to use deadly force against an assailant if they have justifiable reason to fear for their lives and they are not the original aggressor.

Despite this, Dixon is facing potential murder charges for killing her husband while being held on $100,000 bail at the Dallas County Jail.

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Nikki Haley buried for Confederate flag ‘heritage’ defense: ‘Pleading to Trump to make her the VP right here’

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Former South Carolina governor and U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley stepped in it on Friday afternoon after making the bizarre claim that the Confederate flag was a symbol of "service, and sacrifice, and heritage" until convicted murderer Dylann Roof "hijacked" it.

During an interview with conservative talk show host Glenn Beck, Haley stated, "“Here is this guy who comes out with this manifesto, holding the Confederate flag. And [he] had just hijacked everything that people thought of. We don’t have hateful people in South Carolina — there’s always the small minority, that’s always going to be there — but people saw it as service and sacrifice and heritage, but once he did that, there was no way to overcome it.”

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Trump and Giuliani had ties to mobsters portrayed in ‘The Irishman’

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Both President Donald Trump and his attorney Rudy Giuliani have ties to the mobsters depicted in Martin Scorsese’s new film, "The Irishman."

The film is based on the 2003 book I Heard You Paint Houses: Frank “The Irishman” Sheeran & Closing the Case on Jimmy Hoffa, by Charles Brandt, who paints a portrait of corrupt union bosses and hitmen who had business ties to Trump decades ago, reported Rolling Stone.

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Nikki Haley busted by Civil War historian after claiming the Confederate flag was once a symbol of ‘heritage’

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Former South Carolina Governor and Trump United Nations ambassador Nikki Haley on Friday stirred controversy when she claimed that the Confederate flag was once a noble symbol that only lost legitimacy once it was "hijacked" by a mass murderer.

During an interview with talk show host Glenn Beck, Haley described how she reacted after white supremacist Dylann Roof murdered nine people at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church.

"Here is this guy who comes out with this manifesto, holding the Confederate flag," she said, referring to Roof. "And [he] had just hijacked everything that people thought of. We don't have hateful people in South Carolina -- there's always the small minority, that's always going to be there -- but people saw it as service and sacrifice and heritage, but once he did that, there was no way to overcome it."

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