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Black boy turned away from Florida Christian school over natural hair

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A 6-year-old black boy with dreadlocks was turned away from his Florida elementary school because his hairstyle was banned, reports the Orlando Sentinel.

Clinton Stanley Jr. was to attend A Book’s Christian Academy in Apopka, but was told that he was unwelcome because of his hair dreadlocks.

“I respect their rules, but it’s not right,” said father Clinton Stanley Sr. “Allow kids to come as they are. You are a Christian school. In the Bible it says, come as you are,” he added. “You deny a kid an education on his hair?”

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The administrator of the private school, Sue Book, said the rules banning natural black hair have been in place since the academy was founded in 1971.

“No dreads,” she said. “All of our boys have short hair… we don’t allow it. We never have.”

She complained about getting “harassing phone calls,” including a man who allegedly threatened to burn the school down.

“I’ve had all kinds of obscene, ugly calls,” Book said. “It’s just hard.”

Stanley Sr. was using a voucher to send his son to the private school and said the racist policy appears to be targeted at “hoodlums.”

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“You’re disassociating yourself of people of color,” he said.

The Sentinel‘s story discusses homophobic policies banning gay students, the fact that many of the schools don’t have college-educated teachers and use the Bible to teach science class.

Clinton Stanley Jr. is now attending his local public school.

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Trump rages at Twitter — but the social media outlet fears public opinion more than it fears the president

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In a landmark action, Twitter has for the first time attached independent fact-checking information directly to two tweets from President Donald Trump. The president’s tweets make false claims alleging that wider use of mail in ballots will result in an increase in voter fraud.

This is far from the first time Trump has posted falsehoods on Twitter. But it is the first time the social media company has taken action against his account.

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‘I’m entitled’: Kayleigh McEnany defends her 11 mail-in votes while calling it ‘fraud’ for the masses

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White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany on Thursday faced questions from Fox News about why she had voted by mail 11 times even though President Donald Trump has called absentee ballots a "scam."

McEnany was asked about her voting history after the Tampa Bay Times reported that she had used mail-in voting nearly a dozen times in recent years.

"So why is it OK for you to do it?" Fox News host Ed Henry asked McEnany. "I understand you are traveling, you're in a different city. But how can you really be assured that your votes were counted accurately but when other people do it, it's fraud."

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‘They want their civil war’: Far-right ‘boogaloo’ militants have embedded themselves in the George Floyd protests in Minneapolis

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Young, white men dressed in Hawaiian-style print shirts and body armor, and carrying high-powered rifles have been a notable feature at state capitols, lending an edgy and even sometimes insurrectionary tone to gatherings of conservatives angered by restrictions on businesses and church gatherings during the coronavirus pandemic.

Just as many states are reopening their economies — and taking the wind out of the conservative protests — the boogaloo movement found a new galvanizing cause: the protests in Minneapolis against the police killing of George Floyd.

A new iteration of the militia movement, boogaloo was born out of internet forums for gun enthusiasts that repurposed the 1984 movie Breakin’ 2: Electric Boogaloo as a code for a second civil war, and then modified it into phrases like “big luau” to create an insular community for those in on the joke, with Hawaiian-style shirts functioning as an in-real-life identifier. Boogaloo gained currency as an internet meme over the summer of 2019, when it was adopted by white supremacists in the accelerationist tendency. In January, the movement made the leap from the internet to the streets when a group boogaloo-ers showed up at the Second Amendment rally in Richmond, Va.

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