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Ex-Trump election integrity commissioner slams White House for voter fraud lies — and releases documents to prove it

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President Donald Trump (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

A former member of Donald Trump’s election commission blasted the White House for promoting “false” information to further its voter fraud claims.

Portland, Maine’s Sun Journal reported that Maine Secretary of State Matt Dunlap — a former member of the now-disbanded Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity — claimed the Trump administration published false statements about the existence of “substantial evidence of voter fraud.” The administration’s intent, according to Dunlap, was to promote a “pre-ordained objective: ratifying the President’s statements that millions of illegal votes were cast during the 2016 elections.”

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Along with a letter to the White House condemning it for making false statements, Dunlap also published a trove of documents backing up his claim that the administration lied to promote the theory Trump popularized after the election in which he won the electoral college but lost the popular vote to Hillary Clinton.

“After months of litigation that should not have been necessary, I can report that the statements of Vice Chair [Kris] Kobach and the White House were, in fact, false,” the Maine secretary of state wrote in his letter to the White House. “I have reviewed the Commission documents made available to me and they do not contain evidence of widespread voter fraud.”

“Indeed, while staff prepared drafts of a report to be issued to the commission, the sections on evidence of voter fraud are glaringly empty,” he continued. “That the commission predicted it would find widespread evidence of fraud actually reveals a troubling bias.”

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Dunlap, a Democrat, sued the electoral integrity commission in 2017 after the Justice Department resisted his requests to review documents that were supposed to prove widespread voter fraud. In late July, a federal judge ordered the DOJ to hand the documents over, and after reviewing them, Dunlap released them all to the public to bolster his accusations.

“There is no single document that reveals there is no widespread voter fraud,” Dunlap wrote in the letter to Vice President Mike Pence and Kobach, the Kansas Secretary of State who led the commission. “Instead, I rely on the lack of any evidence in the totality of what I have reviewed.”

“After reviewing the material, I have concluded that my only recourse is to publish all of the documents made available to me,” he continued, “so Americans can conclude for themselves that evidence to support the statements of Vice Chair Kobach and the White House regarding the purported preliminary findings of the commission does not exist.”

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You can view the election integrity commission documents released by Dunlap via the Maine Secretary of State’s website.


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‘Trump endangered America’s democracy’: President’s delusion broken down in brutal WaPo analysis

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President Donald Trump's refusal to accept the fact that he lost the 2020 presidential election was the focus of a Washington Post deep-dive published online Saturday night.

The story, by Philip Rucker, Ashley Parker, Josh Dawsey and Amy Gardner, was titled, "20 days of fantasy and failure: Inside Trump’s quest to overturn the election."

"The facts were indisputable: President Trump had lost. But Trump refused to see it that way," the newspaper reported. "Sequestered in the White House and brooding out of public view after his election defeat, rageful and at times delirious in a torrent of private conversations, Trump was, in the telling of one close adviser, like 'Mad King George, muttering, ‘I won. I won. I won.'’"

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Female kicker makes college American football breakthrough

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Vanderbilt University kicker Sarah Fuller made collegiate American football history Saturday as the first woman to play in a "Power Five" contest in the Commodores' 41-0 loss to Missouri.

Fuller, goalkeeper for the school's Southeastern Conference champion women's soccer squad, was given the chance to play on the gridiron after Covid-19 testing left Vanderbilt without a kicker.

"I was really excited to step out on the field and do my thing," Fuller said.

Because Vanderbilt's offensive unit sputtered, her contribution was limited to a single play -- the second-half kickoff. She punched the ball to the Missouri 35-yard line, a tricky low offering compared to the usual deeper kicks, where the Tigers fell upon it.

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2020 Election

Republican’s own standing in Congress now in doubt — did his voter fraud lawsuit backfire?

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A Republican congressman from Pennsylvania has cast doubt on his own legitimacy to serve in Congress with his failed lawsuit attempting to overturn the 2020 election results.

Rep. Mike Kelly (R-PA) attempted to have the courts block certification of the 2020 election results, but his effort was rejected by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court on Saturday.

"The PA Supreme Court dismisses the case brought by U.S. Rep. Mike Kelly that sought to overturn last year’s law creating no-excuse mail voting and to throw out those mail ballots cast in this election," Philadelphia Inquirer correspondent Jonathan Lai reported Saturday. "This is the case the Commonwealth Court had earlier blocked certification in."

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