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Police pulled fake ‘Antifa’ list from neo-Nazi site and used it to target random people who’d signed an anti-Trump petition: lawsuit

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A Harvard Law professor accused the Baton Rouge police department of pulling a list of “antifa” activists from a neo-Nazi website — and is suing to get access to emails about it.

New Orleans’ WGNO reported that Harvard Law School Lecturer Thomas Frampton is suing the Louisiana State Police on behalf of a civil rights lawyer who discovered a list titled “full list of antifa.docx” that bore a striking resemblance to a hoax roster circulated on the neo-Nazi Stormfront website.

In May, New Orleans-based attorney William Most filed a request for public records on all LSP emails “containing hate speech and racist catchphrases,” the report noted, including the “white genocide” conspiracy theory.

The LSP delayed for months, issued an initial denial of the request and then finally released a cache of 64 emails — one of which contained a file named “full list of antifa” as an attachment. According to the suit, the document was circulated among high-ranking officials in the state police and was also given to local law enforcement groups.

Most requested a copy of the email — but was told by the LSP that “releasing the document could ‘compromise’ an ongoing criminal investigation in which LSP anticipates arrests, and reveal the identity of its ‘Confidential Informant,'” the report noted.

Frampton alleges in the lawsuit that the document originated on the conspiracy theory-oriented 8chan message board before being spread on Stormfront and other white supremacist sites.

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Rather than containing an actual list of anti-fascist organizers, the lawsuit alleges that the roster “contains the names of thousands of ordinary, law-abiding citizens who signed an online petition against President Trump.”

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Hope Hicks told Congress that Trump has cut her out of his life — he virtually never calls her anymore

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Former White House Communications Director Hope Hicks was broadly considered to be one of President Donald Trump's favorite staffers.

But when she left the administration in 2018, the president virtually cut off ties to her, and has only spoken with her five times since then, according to the transcript of the closed-door hearing in the House Judiciary Committee on Wednesday:

In her interview, Hope Hicks says she has only spoken to Trump between five and ten times since she left the White House in February 2018. (He used to call that much in a day.) They last spoke in April, when they had dinner. Our story from yesterday:https://t.co/3gzVY21c3z pic.twitter.com/VMZqhnbgib

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Elections regulator warns foreign intrusion into US campaigns is already happening

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In a letter to the Senate Judiciary Committee, the Federal Elections Commission is warning that there is already foreign intrusion in the U.S. campaigns.

FEC chair Ellen L. Weintraub was forced to issue a statement after President Donald Trump said that he wasn't sure what he would do if a foreign government approached him with "dirt" on his political opponent. He said that he "might" tell the FBI but would likely hear what they had to say. He said that it wasn't illegal, but Weintraub issued a statement reiterating that it is illegal.

"I am particularly concerned about the risk of illicit funds and foreign support influencing our political system. Foreign dark money represents a significant vulnerability for American democracy. We do not know the extent to which our political campaigns receive foreign dark money, but we do know that the political money can be weaponized by well-funded hostile powers," the letter warned.

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Trump’s anti-abortion rule attacking Planned Parenthood can go into effect in 49 states: appeals court

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According to the Associated Press, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled on Thursday that President Donald Trump's domestic "gag rule" can take effect while litigation proceeds, potentially making it far harder for low-income women to access abortion care.

District judges in California, Oregon, and Washington previously blocked the rule from taking effect. But a three-judge panel in San Francisco today said that the rule was "reasonable" as an interpretation of federal law, and lifted the injunction preventing it from being enforced. The rule can now take effect in every state except Maryland, where another federal judge's order has still enjoined the policy.

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