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Protesters topple Confederate soldier statue in Chapel Hill, North Carolina

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Protesters toppled a statue of a Confederate soldier on the campus of University of North Carolina on Monday, the latest move to dismantle Civil War symbols amid a fierce debate about race and the legacy of slavery in the United States.

About 300 demonstrators gathered at the base of Silent Sam, a memorial to the Confederate soldiers killed during the Civil War, at about 7 p.m. (2300 GMT) to hold a protest and march. About two hours later, the statue, which had been standing on the Chapel Hill campus since 1913, was on the ground, local media reported.

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Protesters pulled the statue with rope and threw dirt on it, local media reported. The statue was face down in the mud with dirt on the back of its head and its back, according to a Reuters eyewitness.

“Tonight’s actions were dangerous, and we are very fortunate that no one was injured,” the school said in a statement posted on Twitter. “We are investigating the vandalism and assessing the full extent of the damage.”

The efforts by civil rights groups and others to do away with Confederate monuments such as Silent Sam gained momentum three years ago after avowed white supremacist Dylann Roof murdered nine African-Americans at a church in Charleston, South Carolina. The shooting rampage ultimately led to the removal of a Confederate flag from the statehouse in Columbia.

Since then, more than 110 symbols of the Confederacy have been removed across the nation with more than 1,700 still standing, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center.

Many Americans see such statues as symbols of racism and glorifications of the southern states’ defense of slavery in the Civil War, but others view them as important symbols of American history.

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Additional reporting by Brendan O’Brien in Milwaukee; Editing by Christian Schmollinger


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Amy Klobuchar shredded for trying to relate to union audience by saying her ‘name in Spanish class was Elena’

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Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-MN) met with Culinary Union members in Las Vegas, Nevada Tuesday night during the CNN town hall for her opponents. The Culinary Union is made up of the over 60,000 hotel housekeepers, bartenders, restaurant and casino workers, and others who make up the backbone of the entire city. Many members are Spanish-speaking and people of color, yet it was still puzzling why Klobuchar began her speech with a bizarre anecdote.

According to Culinary members and reporters present, she began by saying, "My name is Amy, but when I was in fourth grade Spanish they gave me the name Elena."

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Maddow reports on the ‘doomsday scenario’ that impacted America like a ‘domestic nuclear bomb’

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MSNBC anchor Rachel Maddow on Tuesday reported on the "rule of law emergency" as Attorney General Bill Barr uses the Department of Justice as a "weapon" to benefit Donald Trump.

Maddow reported on all of the key investigations being run by the Southern District of New York (SDNY), which is known as the Sovereign District of New York for its independence from DOJ headquarters.

"They are investigating the Trump inaugural committee, SDNY is investigating the Trumps' family business, SDNY is investigating criminal behavior of President Trump's personal lawyer, Rudy Giuliani," Maddow noted. "SDNY put Michael Cohen in prison for hush money paid by the president's campaign before the 2016 election."

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Trump’s attempt to govern as a ‘king’ is disillusioning an entire generation of young lawyers: Professor

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President Donald Trump's partisan acquittal from impeachment, attacks on the Justice Department, and efforts to shield or pardon criminals and corrupt politicians is already taking its toll.

On MSNBC Tuesday, New York University Law professor Melissa Murray said that the president's behavior is coloring her own law students' view of the world, and of their future career.

"We often learn from you, the big picture of what you tell your students," said host Ari Melber. "For people watching this, if this evidence lines up this way, this looks like it is bad and getting worse. What do you say to them?"

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