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Security guard-turned-GOP-candidate arrests a black man for ‘loitering’ — at his own apartment complex

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A reserve police officer in Indianapolis arrested a black man for loitering at his own apartment complex — and likely misidentified state law in the process.

Indianapolis’ RTV6 reported that “courtesy officer” James Reynolds approached Jaquon Dean in the apartment complex he patrols daily and asked him for ID. The tenant, who was sitting in his car in the parking lot, refused to show it.

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“He’s there every day so he knows I live there,” Dean said.

The two went back-and-forth after the security officer accused the tenant of “loitering” in his car.

Soon after, two assisting officers from the Southport Police Department showed up, causing the incident to turn “physical,” RTV reported. After the ensuing fight, the tenant said he has nerve damage and has lost feeling in one of his hands.

Though the Southport officers are employed by the police department, Reynolds was not in the complex in his capacity as a reserve officer in the town of Sheridan, Indiana. Instead, he was there with his company, Reynolds Security Consulting Corp. RTV noted that Reynolds is also a Republican candidate for Hendricks County Council.

Southport police arrested Dean on charges of resisting arrest and refusing to identify.

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“Under Indiana law, when an officer believes you’ve committed a crime and you refuse to show ID, you’re committing another crime,” RTV reported.

The tenant was not arrested under state loitering laws, though Reynolds sarcastically told him to “Google” the definition of the term.

As The Root‘s Michael Harriot noted, the state loitering statute stipulates that it must take place in a public “way, street, highway, place or alley” — not in a private parking lot.

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You can watch video of the arrest below:

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Joni Ernst accused of involvement in ‘dark money’ re-election scheme: report

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According to a report from the Associated Press, Sen. Joni Ernst (R-IA) has been accused of illegally working with an outside group to help her re-election prospects in a tough 2020 fight with Donald Trump on the ballot.

According to AP: "An outside group founded by top political aides to Sen. Joni Ernst has worked closely with the Iowa Republican to raise money and boost her reelection prospects, a degree of overlap that potentially violates the law."

"Iowa Values, a political nonprofit that is supposed to be run independently, was co-founded in 2017 by Ernst’s longtime consultant, Jon Kohan. It shares a fundraiser, Claire Holloway Avella, with the Ernst campaign," the report continued. "And a condo owned by a former aide — who was recently hired to lead the group — was used as Iowa Values’ address at a time when he worked for her."

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What makes Christmas movies so popular

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If you are one of those people who will settle in this evening with a hot cup of apple cider to watch a holiday movie, you are not alone. Holiday movies have become firmly embedded in Americans’ winter celebrations.

The New York Times reports a massive increase in new holiday movies this year. Disney, Netflix, Lifetime and Hallmark are now in direct competition for viewers’ attention, with both new releases and reruns of the classics.

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Mike Pompeo under increasing scrutiny as as Trump impeachment ramps up: report

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On Saturday, WVAS Radio's Scott Simon profiled Secretary of State Mike Pompeo — and how the impeachment investigation is shaping his political situation.

"As the impeachment inquiry against President Trump continues its march through Congress, questions are churning around his secretary of state, Mike Pompeo," wrote Simon. "For example, did he know, as witnesses testified before House investigators, that President Trump sought political favors from Ukraine in exchange for millions in U.S. assistance? Why did he take days to reveal he was on the now infamous July 25 call between Trump and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy? And does he believe allies of the president who — despite the findings of the intelligence community — claim that Ukraine, not Russia, interfered in the 2016 election?"

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