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Watergate prosecutor would rather have Nixon in the White House than Trump

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A former member of the special prosecutor’s team during the Watergate scandal published a stunning op-ed Monday arguing that for all his faults, President Richard Nixon would be preferable to President Donald Trump.

Philip Allen Lacovara said in the piece for the Washington Post that despite the increasing number of parallels being drawn between Trump and Nixon, these comparisons are unfair — to Nixon.

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“I never thought that I would say this, but I am feeling nostalgic for President Richard M. Nixon,” he wrote.

While both men, he argued, committed “serious breaches of the norms of law,” Nixon has at least some more admirable qualities. Unlike Trump, he was born into poverty and was much more a self-man man. He was also supremely qualified for the position of president, and he was an effective wielder of government power.

One of the odd quirks of history is that one of the most reviled Republican presidents oversaw the creation of the Environmental Protection Agency. Lacovara notes that Nixon was “our first ‘environmental” president.'”

“Nixon also had enough decency and respect for the office to cloak his conniving in secret,” Lacovara wrote. “Trump openly degrades the office by flaunting his contempt for the institutions of government, particularly the Justice Department and intelligence agencies, and by daily defaming his enemies in vitriolic tweets.”

It seems debatable to me, though, whether it’s worse to do bad deeds in public than in private.

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One notable omission from the op-ed is the presidents’ record on foreign policy. While Nixon is best remembered for the Watergate scandal, his most atrocious crimes happened overseas. The number of deaths as a direct result of his continuation of the Vietnam War and for his attacks on Cambodia and Laos is in the hundreds of thousands, if not the millions.

Trump’s record on foreign policy is dismal, but it is nowhere near as cataclysmic as Nixon’s. Trump ought to be held responsible for continuing aid to Saudi Arabia in its brutal assault on Yemen, but this conflict has not reached the scale of the Vietnam War.

Nevertheless, it’s deeply troubling that someone so familiar with Nixon’s domestic crimes would compare his behavior and character favorably to Trump’s. It suggests that the country has a hard time learning from its past and that Trump may not be our last Nixonian president.

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Trump official who doesn’t want poor people to have publicly-funded healthcare wants public to pay for stolen Ivanka jewelry

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President Donald Trump's official in charge of Medicare and Medicaid, Seema Verma, came under fire after Politico reported Saturday that she submitted a $47,000 claim for reimbursement on the taxpayers' dime for stolen, uninsured items items.

https://twitter.com/RepJayapal/status/1203673974867210240

The bulk of the claim—for which the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) ultimately reimbursed her $2,852.40—was for roughly $43,000 worth of jewelry. Among the roughly two dozen pieces was an Ivanka Trump brand pendant whose estimated value was $5,900, according to documents obtained by Politico. A $325 claim for moisturizer was also among the items included.

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Why Colbert got serious — and why Donald Trump isn’t funny

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In her new book, “Irony and Outrage: The Polarized Landscape of Rage, Fear, and Laughter in the United States,” Dannagal Goldthwaite Young advances the argument that the ironic satire of "The Daily Show" and the outrage programming of Fox News — which debuted within months of each other — play remarkably similar roles for their respective audiences, speaking to their distinctively liberal and conservative psychological orientations to motivate not just voter loyalty, but political engagement.

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Head of Jewish Democratic Council of America denounces Trump speech as anti-Semitic

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The executive director of the Jewish Democratic Council of America told Salon on Sunday that President Donald Trump's recent comments about Jewish voters continue "what has been a very negative stereotype of Jews and money and power."

"He has said in the past that he wants Jews to be the ones counting his money," Halie Soifer told Salon. "He has repeatedly made references to what has been a very negative stereotype of Jews and money and power." After saying that "I think that he must believe it, and that is why he continues to repeat it," Soifer noted that Trump was repeating claims that he has made when "typically speaking extemporaneously, and clearly he's speaking from his heart. It's clear that there's quite a bit of hatred in it." Soifer also criticized Trump for having "views of Jews as driven largely by money, which is why he said at this events that Jews have no choice but to support him, referring to tax cuts."

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