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Kavanaugh flounders as Kamala Harris grills him over whether he’s talked to Trump’s personal attorney

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Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) asked Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh pointed questions about the Russia investigation Wednesday during the second day of his Senate confirmation hearing.

This article was originally published at Salon

Harris wanted to know specifically if the judge had ever spoken to anyone about special counsel Robert Mueller’s ongoing investigation from Kasowitz, Benson & Torres, the law firm where Marc Kasowitz, President Donald Trump’s personal attorney, is a partner.

Kavanaugh seemed perplexed by the question – and the exchange got tense from there. “Have you had any conversation about Robert Mueller or his investigation with anyone at that firm? Yes or no?” Harris questioned Kavanaugh.

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“Is there a person you’re talking about?” Kavanaugh replied, refusing to answer the question.

“I’m asking you a very direct question, yes or no?” Harris retorted.

Kavanaugh insisted that he doesn’t know “everyone who works at that law firm,” Harris replied: “I don’t think you need to. I think you need to know who you talked with.”

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Kavanaugh took long pauses in between answers and offered responses such as “I’m not remembering, but I’m happy to be refreshed or if you want to tell me who you’re thinking of.” At every prompt, he stopped short of saying “yes” or “no” – or even “I don’t think so.”

Harris found that hard to believe. She described Kavanaugh’s memory as “impeccable” and reminded him that he had been speaking at length to the committee for hours Wednesday about issues that date much further back in time than Mueller’s investigation into the 2016 presidential election.

READ MORE: Another American happy warrior laid to rest: John McCain’s legacy of gung-ho militarism

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But Kavanaugh did not bite. He continued to speak around the question, asking again for Harris to give him a name.

“It’s a really specific question,” Harris said. “I think you’re thinking of someone, and you don’t want to tell us.”

This back and forth went on for several minutes, and the closest Kavanaugh came to answer Harris’ yes or no question was the following: “I’m not remembering anything like that, but I want to know a roster of people [who work at the firm], and I want to know more.”

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It remains unclear if Harris has evidence that Kavanaugh spoke to someone from the firm about the investigation, as she eventually abandoned the question. (A Democratic aide told CNN that “we have reason to believe that a conversation happened and are continuing to pursue it.”)

But Harris may have engaged in this line of questioning, because some Democrats are worried about Kavanaugh’s stance on presidential authority and whether or not he believes a sitting president may be indicted, which could be pertinent if special counsel Robert Mueller’s probe into alleged collusion between Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign and Russia were to find any information incriminating the commander-in-chief himself.

“The Justice Department has said on two separate occasions — in 1973 and in 2000— that the president cannot be charged with a crime while in office. The Supreme Court would have to rule on that question to settle the matter for good,” Business Insider reported. “In previous writings, Kavanaugh has advocated for more latitude within the executive branch. An analysis from The Washington Post notes that this could mean Kavanaugh believes current law is too restrictive on the office of the president.”

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Here’s how lawyers enabling Trump’s obstruction can have their livelihoods stripped from them — by anyone

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In a column for the Daily Beast, a former Democratic member of the U.S. House of Representatives laid out a simple way to force lawyers advising aides to Donald Trump to defy Congressional subpoenas -- or avoiding one themselves -- to stop giving bad advice by moving to have them disbarred.

According to Brad Miller, who represented North Carolina in Congress between 2003 and 2013, the way in which former President Bill Clinton's impeachment was handled -- and the penalty he eventually received -- is a road map for legal retaliation even if Democrats in Congress won't do it.

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Lara Trump snarls at critics of ‘send her back’ for pushing a ‘biased, racially-charged narrative’

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Lara Trump, the wife of President Donald Trump's son Eric, has accused CNN anchor Anderson Cooper of pushing a "biased, racially-charged narrative" after he criticized her recent defense of the Trump administration over the "send her back" scandal.

This article first appeared on Salon.

"Anyone insinuating that there was some premeditated plan to orchestrate the “send her back” chant is obviously desperate to continue pushing a biased, racially-charged narrative. #FakeNews," Trump posted to her Twitter account on Saturday. She included a link to the Washington Examiner, a right-leaning newspaper which included a quote from Cooper blasting Trump for supposedly "lying" about her role in whipping up a crowd to chant "send her back" about Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn.

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2020 Election

Trump’s trade war with China has led to foreign investments in the US drying up: report

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Not only are U.S. manufacturers and farmers feeling the devastating brunt of Donald Trump's ongoing trade war with China -- among other countries -- now the New York Times reports that foreign investors no longer see America as a safe bet to park their money.

According to the report, "the once steady flow of Chinese cash into America, with Chinese investment plummeting by nearly 90 percent since President Trump took office."

With the report stating, the drop-off "stems from tougher regulatory scrutiny in the United States and a less hospitable climate toward Chinese investment, as well Beijing’s tightened limits on foreign spending," one analyst blamed the increasingly hostile trade relationship between the two countries.

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