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US companies react on impact of Trump trade tariffs

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China’s foreign ministry said on Monday it would retaliate if U.S. President Donald Trump goes ahead with his plan of imposing tariffs on practically all Chinese imports.

Trump on Friday threatened additional duties on $267 billion of Chinese goods over and above planned tariffs on $200 billion worth of goods.

The following are comments made by U.S. companies after the Trump administration said on July 10 that it would slap tariffs on $200 billion of Chinese imports.

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** Apple Inc said a “wide range” of its products including the Apple Watch would be affected by proposed U.S. tariffs on Chinese goods but gave no sign of an impact on its iPhone.

Apple said its MacMini, a low-priced computer that comes without a keyboard or mouse, would be affected. Many Apple accessories, such as mice, keyboards, chargers and even leather covers for iPhones and iPads would also face tariffs, it said.

AirPods headphones, some of Apple’s Beats headphones and its new HomePod smart speaker also face levies. Apple added that computer parts for its U.S. operations would be hit by the tariffs.

** Dell Technologies said the proposed tariffs will increase costs of vital parts and components for its U.S. services and manufacturing operations.

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Dell added that the tariffs on desktops/servers, computer parts, network switches could result in “serious damage” to the company and its employees.

** Intel Corp said proposed tariffs would negatively affect U.S. businesses and “stifle advancements” in telecom infrastructure, including next generation technologies like 5G.

The company said the tariffs will raise costs for U.S.-based technology companies that manufacture ICT products such as desktop computers, laptops and servers.

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** Fitness tracker maker Fitbit said increased tariffs would compromise its investments in U.S.-based innovation. The company also said tariffs on wearable products would not effectively advance the administration’s goals.

** Agilent Technologies said the increased duties would financially impede its U.S. operations and its end customers in the U.S. and abroad. It added that substantial tariff increases will limit its ability to reinvest in U.S. operations, affecting employees engaged in R&D, design, other support operations.

Agilent also said it does not believe the goods it imports are specifically covered by the “Made in China 2025” industrial policy.

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** Office Depot said the tariff proposal, which covers non-household seating and furniture it sells, would lead to immense supply chain disruptions and a likely loss of jobs. Office Depot also said the tariffs would impact small- and medium-sized U.S. companies.

** Newell Brands’ units, including Goody Products and Rubbermaid Commercial Products, said tariffs on items ranging from elastic hair bands to art supplies would hurt American consumers since the tariff prices will be paid by the company and consumers.

They also said consumer goods targeted under tariffs do not come under the scope of “Made in China 2025” program.

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** Mattel Inc said the proposed tariff on products such as high chairs and bath seats will result in higher prices as China supplies vast majority of these products with no alternative readily available.

Mattel also said additional tariffs could lead to job losses as the toymaking industry is already suffering from Babies ‘R’ Us/Toys ‘R’ Us closures.

** Whirlpool Corp said proposed tariffs on components from China would increase costs and create supply chain problem for U.S. manufacturers, putting them at a competitive disadvantage.

The company said the administration should remove “critical components” such as parts of refrigerators and mixers from the proposed list and add finished products such as dishwashers to mitigate negative impact on U.S. manufacturing.

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** Carrier Transicold, a unit of Carrier Corp/United Technologies Corp, said it was concerned the proposed 10 percent additional duty on various industrial components will reduce its global competitiveness and undercut its U.S. operations.

Carrier asked USTR to exclude items including parts for refrigerators, freezers and other refrigerating or freezing equipment from the proposed tariffs.

Compiled by Arjun Panchadar in Bengaluru; editing by Patrick Graham and Anil D’Silva

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Trump’s quid pro quo isn’t Mitch McConnell’s only headache

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William Taylor is the US senior diplomat to Ukraine. He gave testimony to Congress Wednesday confirming what we already know: the president held up aid in exchange for Ukraine’s president to announce publicly that he was investigating Joe Biden.

That, my friend, is a quid pro quo.

This article was originally published at The Editorial Board

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WATCH: Trump delivers incoherent rant about Obama during fact-free announcement on Syria withdrawal

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President Donald Trump delivered an incoherent rant about former President Barack Obama on Wednesday as he announced that he would lift sanctions on the Turkish government.

Even though America's Kurdish allies are still furious after the president gave Turkey a green light to invade their territory in northern Syria, Trump nonetheless portrayed his policies as an unqualified success.

"It’s too early for me to be congratulated, but we have done a good job," Trump said. "We’ve saved a lot of lives. Most importantly, we have avoided another costly military intervention that could have led to disastrous far-reaching consequences. Many thousands of people could have been killed."

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‘Serious harm and suffering’: Jared Kushner’s apartment management company sued for ‘hundreds of thousands of violations’

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An apartment management company owned by Jared Kushner is being sued by Maryland Attorney General Brian Frosh, who says the company “victimized consumers, many of whom are financially vulnerable” and committed “hundreds of thousands of violations” of consumer protection laws, the Baltimore Sun reports.

The lawsuit was filed this Monday against Westminster Management and alleges that the company utilizes "unfair and deceptive" rental practices in its Baltimore apartment complexes, which were reportedly infested with rats. In a statement, Kushner Cos. CEO Laurent Morali said that the company refuses to be "extorted by an ambitious attorney general who clearly cares more about scoring political points than fighting real crime and improving the lives of the people of Maryland."

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