Quantcast
Connect with us

US labor board moves to ease companies’ liability for contractor, franchisee violations

Published

on

The U.S. agency that enforces federal labor law on Thursday took the first steps toward loosening an Obama-era standard that made it easier to hold companies liable for illegal labor practices by their contractors and franchisees.

The five-member National Labor Relations Board, whose majority was appointed by President Donald Trump, proposed a rule that would restore an earlier standard. Under it companies were considered to be so-called joint employers with their contractors or franchisees only when they exercised direct control over labor issues such as hiring and firing workers and setting wages.

In a 2015 decision, the NLRB had said a company could be a joint employer when it has indirect influence over the working conditions of a contractor’s employees. Joint employers can be held liable for labor law violations and required to bargain with unions representing contract workers.

Overturning that standard has been a top priority of business groups, which say the Obama-era ruling could upend supply chains and the franchise model.

Unions, worker advocates and many Democrats have said the standard the board created in 2015 was necessary because of a steady increase in the outsourcing of labor in many industries over the last few decades.

ADVERTISEMENT

The board said its proposal would be formally published on Friday, kicking off a 60-day public comment period.

The NLRB had overturned the Obama-era joint employment standard in a December ruling. But it wiped out that decision two months later because a board member appointed by President Donald Trump had a conflict of interest.

In June, NLRB Chairman John Ring, a Trump appointee, said that adopting a rule would provide a higher level of certainty to employers and unions than issuing a new decision.

ADVERTISEMENT

Reporting by Daniel Wiessner in Albany, New York, Editing by Alexia Garamfalvi and Steve Orlofsky


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected]. Send news tips to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Harrowing new report: Malicious browser extensions are stealing your personal information

Published

on

Web browsers have become the equivalent of safe deposit boxes, digital spaces where we stuff our personal information and expect it to be kept safe. While the websites that harbor sensitive data generally swear that this information is private and protected, a detailed report by cybersecurity researcher Sam Jadali, explained in depth by Dan Goodin at Ars Technica, found that eight browser extensions for Google Chrome and Firefox were harvesting personal data from millions of people, unbeknownst to both them and to the makers of those browsers.

Continue Reading

Facebook

The US has a history of testing biological weapons on the public – were infected ticks used too?

Published

on

The House of Representatives has instructed the Pentagon to disclose whether it used ticks to infect the American public with Lyme disease between 1950 and 1975. The allegation comes from Chris Smith, the Republican representative for New Jersey. A long-standing campaigner on Lyme disease, Smith says the claims are from a new book about the illness and the man who discovered it – a bioweapons scientist called Willy Burgdofer.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

What drove the New Yorker’s Jane Mayer into Al Franken denialism?

Published

on

The defenders of Sen. Al Franken are perhaps the single most embarrassing group of allegedly progressive people in the Democratic coalition. Franken, who resigned from the Senate in January 2018, was accused by eight different women of sexual impropriety. Most of these accusations were both serious and credible, in that the women making them were mostly liberals who had no apparent reason to lie about Franken's behavior toward them. Despite this, Franken's defenders are married to the delusional belief that it's all just a frame-up and that if he'd had "due process" in the form of a Senate ethics investigation (run by Republicans, who control that chamber) he would have somehow managed to prove this.

Continue Reading
 
 
 

Copyright © 2019 Raw Story Media, Inc. PO Box 21050, Washington, D.C. 20009 | Masthead | Privacy Policy | For corrections or concerns, please email [email protected]

close-image
Join Me. Try Raw Story Investigates for $1. Invest in Journalism. Escape Ads.
close-image