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‘Terrorism’ ad by indicted Republican roils California election

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When a Democrat with Palestinian-Mexican ancestry who had never before run for office was elected to challenge a Republican incumbent in a staunchly conservative southern California congressional district, few gave him much of a chance.

But five-term U.S. Representative Duncan Hunter, who has been criminally charged with misusing campaign funds, is concerned enough about Ammar Campa-Najjar to issue a YouTube ad accusing his Democratic rival of trying “to hide his family’s ties to terrorism.”

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It was a reference to his Palestinian grandfather, who was involved in a 1972 plot to kill Israeli athletes at the Olympics and was killed the following year by Israeli commandos.

The ad, released on Wednesday, shows Hunter, a former U.S. Marine who followed his father into Congress, dressed in camouflage and saying he approved the message.

Campa-Najjar told Reuters on Saturday Hunter’s ad was “racist, xenophobic and rooted in lies.”

He noted he had security clearances to work in the White House and the Labor Department under former President Barack Obama.

“If Hunter applied for that clearance under indictment, he would be denied, which is why (House of Representatives Speaker) Paul Ryan stripped him of his seat on the Armed Services Committee, because he would have access to confidential materials. That’s the irony of this,” Campa-Najjar said.

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“I think he’s trying to tap into dark emotions and I don’t think people will rise to that,” Campa-Najjar said.

Hunter’s campaign did not respond to requests for comment.

Democrats need to pick up 23 House of Representatives seats in the Nov. 6 congressional elections if they wish to take a majority and serve as a more effective counter to U.S. President Donald Trump. Republicans can ill afford to lose normally safe seats like Hunter’s, in a district including San Diego, as they look to keep control of that chamber.

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Polls show Hunter maintaining a comfortable lead over Campa-Najjar, though not as wide as his 27 percentage point margin of victory in 2016.

A Monmouth University Poll of 401 voters conducted between Sept. 22 and 26, found 53 percent of likely voters supported Hunter versus 38 percent for Campa-Najjar. The poll had a 5.3 percentage point margin of error.

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Campa-Najjar’s campaign says its polling shows a much closer race.

FAMILY BLAME GAME
The 29-year-old Democratic challenger is the son of a Mexican-American mother and a Palestinian father who immigrated from the Middle East. He stresses his Christian faith on the campaign trail and has tried repeatedly to distance himself from his Palestinian grandfather.

He responded to Hunter’s ad by pointing to the Republican’s own family troubles: “He knows I’m not responsible for my family’s actions, just like his wife isn’t responsible for his.”

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Hunter, 41, and his wife pleaded not guilty on Aug. 23 to charges of misusing $250,000 in campaign funds to pay for their children’s private school tuition, lavish travel including a trip to Italy and restaurant meals that cost hundreds of dollars. He has said the charges were politically motivated.

Hunter is not the only Republican congressman running for reelection while fighting criminal charges. U.S. Representative Chris Collins is also campaigning in a normally solidly Republican western New York state district while awaiting trial on insider trading charges that he has denied.

Both Hunter and Collins were early supporters of Trump, who early this month criticized Attorney General Jeff Sessions for allowing federal prosecutors to charge Republican candidates in an election year.

Campa-Najjar’s fundraising has outpaced Hunter’s, according to Federal Election Commission data through June 2018. Hunter’s campaign had reported contributions of $854,787, while Campa-Najjar had reported nearly $1.1 million.

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Writing by Bill Tarrant; Editing by Scott Malone and Alistair Bell


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
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Watch Rachel Maddow and Lawrence O’Donnell on the GOP effort to convict Trump for President Pence

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MSNBC anchor Rachel Maddow on Tuesday reported on the effort by "Republicans for the Rule of Law" to convince GOP senators that the party may be better off with Mike Pence in the Oval Office.

If Trump is convicted in his impeachment trial and removed from office, Vice President Pence would ascend to the presidency.

"Here it is in the wild. This is a billboard truck that puttered around Washington, D.C. all day, shuttling between the capitol and the White House and the Trump Hotel," Maddow reported, showing images of the moving billboard.

Moddow noted that on one side the truck read, "Remove Trump for Pence" and on the other, "Pence, it could be worse."

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GOP choice could be a fair Senate trial now — or a criminal trial in New York this summer: law professor

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The decision facing Senate Republicans is not whether or not to allow witnesses, but is actually whether they want Donald Trump's trial to take place in the U.S. Senate now, or in New York state criminal court closer to the 2020 presidential election, according to Fordham Law Prof. Jed Shugerman.

Shugerman was interviewed on Tuesday by MSNBC's Chris Hayes.

The host noted recent reporting showing it is the vulnerable Senate Republicans up for re-election in 2020 who are most opposed to calling witnesses.

"I think they're panicked, but they're not gaming this out. They would prefer, if they understood what else could happen outside the halls of the Senate, they would prefer for the Senate to control this process," Shugeman explained.

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White House lawyers’ defense of Trump was ‘grossly misleading and a violation of ethical duties’: Preet Bharara

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On CNN Tuesday, former Manhattan U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara pointed out that if White House lawyers had any advance knowledge of former National Security Adviser John Bolton's testimony, they had an ethical obligation not to hide it from the Senate.

"There is ... an ethical question," said Bharara. "They were asked today in a briefing, where they had a source, who was asked the question, did you review the manuscript, and they said no, we didn't review the manuscript. They were then asked where you briefed on the contents of the manuscript and they said, that's all we're going to say."

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