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Black security guard stops shooter in a bar — then gets gunned down by cop who mistook him for criminal

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A black security guard this weekend prevented a potential mass shooting at the bar where he worked — and was then gunned down by an Illinois police officer who mistook him for a criminal.

WGN TV reports that 26-year-old armed security guard Jemel Roberson was working at Manny’s Blue Room Bar in Robbins, Illinois on Sunday morning when he was attacked by a gun-wielding man whom witnesses say had been kicked out of the bar earlier in the evening.

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Roberson returned fire on the man and managed to subdue him and pin him to the ground.

However, when a Midlothian, Illinois police officer showed up on the scene, he opened fire and killed Roberson because he thought Roberson was the true assailant.

“Everybody was screaming out, ‘he was a security guard,’ and they basically saw a black man with a gun and killed him,” witness Adam Harris tells WGN TV.

The Midlothian Police Department has so far released very little information about the shooting and is only confirming that one of its officers was involved. According to WGN, the State Police Public Integrity Task Force is running an investigation of the officer’s decision to open fire on Roberson.

Pastor Patricia Hill of Chicago’s Purposed Church tells WGN TV that she’s horrified to see another young black man fatally shot by police despite the fact that he had risked his own life to prevent a potential mass shooting.

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“Once again it’s the continued narrative that we see of shoot first, ask questions later,” she said.

Watch WGN TV’s report on the shooting below.

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2020 Election

Demand grows for Pete Buttigieg to come clean about his time at ‘corporate greed machine’ McKinsey

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"The political risk is not that his former employer, a multibillion-dollar corporate entity that promotes fraud across the globe, will be mad at him. It's what he would have to disclose."

Days after reports surfaced about the global consulting firm McKinsey's work advising the Trump administration on immigration policy, calls are growing louder for South Bend, Indiana mayor and 2020 presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg to disclose details about the work he did for the company.

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Deutsche Bank busted in money-laundering scheme case

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Prosectors in Frankfurt have dropped their investigation into two Deutsche Bank employees who were accused of aiding tax evasion schemes in the Virgin Islands, due to "lack of suspicion." The institution has instead been fined for compliance lapses.

“With the closure of these proceedings it is clear that the prosecutors have not found any instances of criminal misconduct on the part of Deutsche Bank employees following the raid of our Frankfurt office in November 2018,” Deutsche Bank spokesman Joerg Eigendorf said in a statement.

“The investigation that has now been closed due to lack of sufficient suspicion had a heavy impact on Deutsche Bank last year,” he added. “It is true that the bank had weaknesses in its control environment in the past. We identified these weaknesses and we have addressed them in a disciplined manner.”

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North Carolina towns forced to cancel Christmas celebrations over fear of violence from right wing extremist groups

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Two North Carolina towns are canceling their annual Christmas celebration parades "amid fears of violence due to Confederate groups’ participation in the events," The Daily Beast reports.

Citing a “potential for violence,” for the first time in over 70 years the town of Wake Forest, North Carolina says it will have no Christmas parade. Garner, NC, has also canceled its Christmas parade.

The Daily Beast cites "reports that Garner had plans to include a float sponsored by a chapter of the Sons of Confederate Veterans but said social-media posts led town officials to believe 'the event could be targeted for disruption.'"

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