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Central American caravan gains speed, first migrants reach border

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Hundreds of Central Americans arrived at the United States’s southern border Wednesday, defying visiting US Defense Secretary Jim Mattis, as the rest of a migrant caravan dramatically accelerated its pace to join them.

Large groups of migrants gathered on the beach in the northern city of Tijuana at the border fence that separates Mexico from California, climbing on top of it and even jumping down to the other side as US border patrol agents looked on — before quickly scrambling back to the Mexican side.

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“We’re not criminals!” some of them shouted, in a pointed message to US President Donald Trump, who has deployed some 5,900 troops to the border as the caravan approaches.

Another 4,000 migrants — the main caravan — are expected to reach the border in a matter of days, fleeing poverty and violence in their home countries.

At least nine migrants from the caravan crossed decisively into the US side, and were promptly arrested by border patrol officers, an AFP correspondent said.

They included a mother with her four children and a 19-year-old pregnant woman from Honduras named Jazmin Monserrat.

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“She didn’t tell me she was going to do it. Before I knew it she was on the other side,” her 17-year-old husband, Moises Hernandez, told AFP.

“I understand. She’s looking for a new life. We’re tired of the poverty in our country.”

Under an executive order Trump issued last week, migrants who do not cross at official border posts will no longer be allowed to request asylum, and face automatic deportation.

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Many of the migrants in Tijuana say they will wait for the rest of the caravan to arrive before trying to cross.

– Troops ‘necessary’ –

Visiting the other end of the border — Base Camp Donna, in Texas — Mattis insisted the military deployment was “necessary” to support US Border Patrol, even as some in Trump’s own Republican party criticized it as a stunt.

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AFP / Guillermo AriasA man with a child in his arms walks toward a US patrol after illegally crossing the US-Mexico border

Mattis said the military was helping border agents with a range of jobs, from ferrying them around by helicopter to putting up razor-wire fencing along the border.

There are now nearly 800 migrants from the original caravan in Tijuana, across the border from San Diego, California, after a new group of 350 arrived Wednesday morning.

Another 2,000 meanwhile traveled through the night on some 20 buses arranged by a Catholic priest, moving rapidly into northern Mexico after an arduous, month-long trek across the south and center of the country.

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The buses dropped them off in the town of Navojoa, in the northern state of Sonora, then returned to pick up a second group of 2,000 migrants who had stayed behind.

Navojoa sits about 1,200 kilometers (750 miles) from Tijuana, the spot where the migrants plan to cross the border, and more than 3,000 kilometers from the town where they began their journey on October 13: San Pedro Sula, Honduras.

But the caravan is moving far more quickly through the dangerous and sparsely populated north than it did through the south and center of the country, thanks to donated transport — sometimes from local authorities who would rather send the migrants on their way than host them in shelters.

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“We want to arrive as soon as possible. We’ve been on the road for more than a month,” said Saul Rivera, 40, a construction worker from El Salvador.

– More caravans coming –

At the pace they are now traveling, the full caravan of some 5,000 migrants could be at the border by Friday.

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Trump turned the caravan into a hot-button issue ahead of last week’s US midterm elections, claiming — without providing evidence — it included “hardened criminals” and “unknown Middle Easterners” who were about to “assault” the United States.

AFP / ALFREDO ESTRELLACentral American migrants on a bus in La Concha, in the northwestern Mexican state of Sinaloa

The migrants insist they are simply seeking a better future away from Central America’s “Northern Triangle” — El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras, poor countries where gang violence has fueled some of the highest murder rates in the world.

At least two more caravans have formed behind the first, and are currently working their way up through Mexico with about 2,000 migrants each.

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… then let us make a small request. Like you, we here at Raw Story believe in the power of progressive journalism — and we’re investing in investigative reporting as other publications give it the ax. Raw Story readers power David Cay Johnston’s DCReport, which we've expanded to keep watch in Washington. We’ve exposed billionaire tax evasion and uncovered White House efforts to poison our water. We’ve revealed financial scams that prey on veterans, and efforts to harm workers exploited by abusive bosses. We’ve launched a weekly podcast, “We’ve Got Issues,” focused on issues, not tweets. Unlike other news sites, we’ve decided to make our original content free. But we need your support to do what we do.

Raw Story is independent. You won’t find mainstream media bias here. We’re not part of a conglomerate, or a project of venture capital bros. From unflinching coverage of racism, to revealing efforts to erode our rights, Raw Story will continue to expose hypocrisy and harm. Unhinged from corporate overlords, we fight to ensure no one is forgotten.

We need your support to keep producing quality journalism and deepen our investigative reporting. Every reader contribution, whatever the amount, makes a tremendous difference. Invest with us in the future. Make a one-time contribution to Raw Story Investigates, or click here to become a subscriber. Thank you.



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Ex-Houston cop is charged with murder after his fraudulent search warrant got a couple killed

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Former Houston police officer Gerald Goines has been indicted on felony murder charges in relation to a drug raid in January that left a couple dead, the Houston Chronicle reported this Friday.

Questions about the raid, which took place January 28, began to swirl when it was revealed that Goines had lied to obtain the search warrant. The raid resulted in a shootout that killed 58-year-old Rhogena Nicholas and 59-year-old Dennis Tuttle. Goines was also wounded in the shootout as were four other officers.

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‘Making things worse’: National Farmer’s Union chief unloads on Trump in blistering statement on trade war

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Roger Johnson, the president of the National Farmers Union, delivered a blistering rebuke to President Donald Trump after he responded to new tariffs from China by issuing a purported "order" telling American companies to look for alternative places to manufacture their goods.

In an official statement, Johnson pointed out that farmers so far have felt the brunt of the president's trade war, as China has slapped heavy tariffs on key agricultural products such as soybeans.

He also crushed the president for failing to make any progress on reopening the Chinese market to American goods.

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Google tells workers to avoid arguing politics in house

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Google on Friday told employees to focus on work instead of heated debates about politics with colleagues at the internet company, which has long been known for encouraging people to speak their minds.

Updated workplace guidelines for "Googlers" called on them to be responsible, helpful, and thoughtful during exchanges on internal message boards or other conversation forums.

"While sharing information and ideas with colleagues helps build community, disrupting the workday to have a raging debate over politics or the latest news story does not," the updated guidelines stated.

"Our primary responsibility is to do the work we?ve each been hired to do, not to spend working time on debates about non-work topics."

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