Quantcast
Connect with us

Mexico’s incoming government just embarrassed Donald Trump

Published

on

Press conference by US President Donald Trump at the NATO Summit in Brussels.

The incoming government of Mexico is disputing recent reports that it struck a major deal about the fate of migrant asylum-seekers with President Donald Trump.

This article first appeared on Salon.

Olga Sánchez Cordero, Mexico’s incoming interior secretary, explained in a statement published by CNN on Sunday that their government has not made any deal with the Trump administration about the fate of migrants who stay in their country before entering the United States. This directly contradicts statements made by Trump and a report by The Washington Post, a newspaper that is hardly known for being sympathetic to the president.

ADVERTISEMENT

“Mexico’s next federal administration does not consider within its plans that Mexico assume the condition of ‘third secure country’ for the attention of Central American migrants or citizens of other countries in Mexican territory or those who will have that intention in the future,” Sánchez Cordero said in the statement, adding that the new administration’s focus will be in assisting the migrants as they attempt to receive food, health, and shelter, as well as make sure that their human rights aren’t violated.

In the report by The Washington Post on Saturday, the newspaper wrote that “the Trump administration has won the support of Mexico’s incoming government for a plan to remake U.S. border policy by requiring asylum seekers to wait in Mexico while their claims move through U.S. courts, according to Mexican officials and senior members of President-elect Andrés Manuel López Obrador’s transition team.” It also wrote:

The deal took shape last week in Houston during a meeting between Marcelo Ebrard, Mexico’s incoming foreign minister, and top U.S. officials such as Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen, according to U.S. and Mexican officials.

Nielsen has been fighting to keep her job since the midterms, and while Trump has told aides he plans to replace her, the president praised her this past week for “trying.”

Trump himself seemed confident on Saturday that some kind of deal had been reached, based on a pair of tweets he posted discussing the supposed deal.

“Migrants at the Southern Border will not be allowed into the United States until their claims are individually approved in court. We only will allow those who come into our Country legally. Other than that our very strong policy is Catch and Detain. No ‘Releasing’ into the U.S…” Trump wrote in his first tweet. He followed it by adding, “….All will stay in Mexico. If for any reason it becomes necessary, we will CLOSE our Southern Border. There is no way that the United States will, after decades of abuse, put up with this costly and dangerous situation anymore!”

ADVERTISEMENT

This isn’t the first time this month that Trump’s attempts to crack down on immigration have been dealt a major blow. Last week Trump suffered a major legal setback when Judge Jon S. Tigar of the US District Court for the Northern District of California decided that the president did not have the authority to ban granting asylum to immigrants who attempt to enter the United States outside of a legal checkpoint.

“Whatever the scope of the President’s authority, he may not rewrite the immigration laws to impose a condition that Congress has expressly forbidden,” Tigar wrote.

 

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

America could be on the verge of a huge shift to the left — here’s what you can expect

Published

on

By

A new socialist movement is cohering in the US, thanks in large part to the popular class politics of Bernie Sanders. But as that movement grows and progresses, it is bound to run into dangerous obstacles and thorny contradictions. The new US socialist movement is without a single "line" or monolithic political position. That's a strength of the movement, since none of us has all the answers. Still, many people in the movement, ourselves included, feel strongly about certain approaches to strategy. One approach we feel strongly about is what we call "the democratic road to socialism," or the idea that we need to make good use of the democratic structures and processes available to us (and to improve and expand them) in order to advance our cause.A country like the United States has both a well-developed capitalist state, beholden to the capitalist class and armed to the teeth, and mechanisms for democratic participation in that state that allow people to exercise some measure of control over their representatives. Even though their choices are limited, their representatives are bought off by the rich, and the capitalist class holds the entire system hostage with the threat of devastating economic retaliation if things don't go their way, the system does have some basic democratic elements that its citizens largely affirm and occasionally participate in.This is a tricky situation to navigate. If the democratic capitalist state were less developed, it might be possible to convince people to simply storm the gates, tear up the old rules, and start fresh in a socialist society. This is what socialists tried to do in Russia in 1917: the state was weak and after centuries of autocratic rule it didn't have much legitimacy in the eyes of most Russians, so revolutionaries could get popular support for scrapping it and starting over.
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney caught on tape saying US is ‘desperate’

Published

on

White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney was caught on tape admitting that, despite President Donald Trump's policy preferences, the United States is "desperate" for more immigrants, according to a recording obtained by the Washington Post.

He further undermined the administration's claims of its economic prowess, admitting that immigration is necessary for sustained economic growth.

"We are desperate — desperate — for more people," Mulvaney said, according to the post, stressing that it should be legal. "We are running out of people to fuel the economic growth that we've had in our nation over the last four years. We need more immigrants."

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Intelligence failure: Donald Trump’s personal politics comes second to national security

Published

on

Joe Maguire, a Manhattan College alum whose life and career we admire, is out as President Trump’s acting director of national intelligence for committing an unpardonable sin. He told the unvarnished truth.A president needs confidence in his appointees. Trump apparently has more trust in Maguire’s replacement, U.S. Ambassador to Germany Ric Grenell, despite the fact that he lacks a background in intelligence.But watch that trust evaporate if and when Grenell dares deliver facts the president really doesn’t want to hear.A week ago, a Maguire aide briefed the House Intelligence Committee on a bi... (more…)

Continue Reading
 
 
close-image