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Trump calls off US military cemetery visit due to bad weather

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US President Donald Trump on Saturday called off a trip to a World War I US military cemetery in France because of bad weather, the White House said.

After talks with French counterpart Emmanuel Macron, Trump cancelled his visit to Belleau Wood battlefield and cemetery 80 kilometres (50 miles) northeast of Paris because of “scheduling and logistical difficulties caused by the weather,” his administration said.

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He and his wife Melania were to have flown to the site of a 1918 battle led by US Marines against German forces.

A US delegation led by Chief of Staff General John Kelly and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Joe Dunford will visit the cemetery instead, the White House added.

Trump was due to join other world leaders for dinner at the Musee d’Orsay art museum Saturday evening, before visiting another American cemetery that holds war dead, at Suresnes, in the Paris suburbs, Sunday morning.

Some 70 leaders will gather at 11 am Sunday (1000 GMT) at the tomb of the Unknown Soldier at the Arc de Triomphe, in Paris, to mark the 100th annniversary of the end of World War I.

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Republican bloviates about withholding Dem’s documents for the record — then quickly backs down when confronted

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Rep. Doug Collins (R-GA) had a little tantrum in the House Judiciary Committee Thursday when Rep. Eric Swalwell (D-CA) tried to add documents to the official congressional record. Chairman Jerry Nadler (D-NY) has added, with unanimously consent, whatever both sides sought to enter into the record.

According to CNN's Manu Raju, Swalwell then walked across the dais to Collins and handed the articles to him. One was a Los Angeles Times piece that detailed how Ukrainian soldiers died while battling Russia while they waited on the aid from the United States.

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David Cay Johnston: Senators have a choice — convict Trump or crown Him

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Letting the President Get Away with Contempt of Congress Will Make the Legislative Branch as Irrelevant as the Roman Senate

The two articles of impeachment, which have drawn criticism as either too much or too little, strike me as cleverly drafted to put Senate Republicans in a most uncomfortable box.

The second article, obstruction of Congress, should be the tougher one for Senate Republicans. It flows from Donald Trump’s stonewalling the impeachment inquiry – no testimony, no documents.

On top of this utter contempt of Congress, Trump claims absolute immunity from investigation by anyone for anything. His lawyers asserted in federal court in October that the NYPD could not investigate even if Trump literally shot someone on Fifth Avenue.

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2020 Election

Republicans expect impeachment to cost the GOP seats in 2020: ‘Cult members can’t see past the Kool-Aid’

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As the GOP strategy for the impeachment of President Donald Trump seems to be a combination of shouting and stubbornly denying facts, even some Republicans are worried that ignoring reality could have historic implications.

In 1974, Republicans suffered an epic defeat following the impeachment inquiry that resulted in the resignation of GOP President Richard Nixon.

"Nearly a half-century ago, [GOP House Judiciary Committee members] who protected then-President Richard Nixon suffered a hefty price for it just months later in the 1974 midterm elections: Five of the 10 members who voted against all three articles of impeachment saw their seats flip to Democrats. Four were defeated outright. The fifth retired, and the Republican hoping to succeed him lost," HuffPost reported Thursday. "In contrast, House Republicans as a whole lost only 25% of their seats that November ? still a staggering loss rate, but only half of that suffered by members of the Judiciary Committee."

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