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US FAA launches high-priority probe of Boeing’s safety analyses in wake of crash: WSJ

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The U.S. aviation regulator has launched a high-priority probe of the safety analyses performed over the years by Boeing Co (BA.N), following the crash of a Lion Air jet in Indonesia last month, the Wall Street Journal reported on Tuesday.

The Federal Aviation Administration said it was reviewing details surrounding the safety data and conclusions the company previously provided to it as part of certifying 737 MAX 8 and MAX 9 models, the WSJ reported.

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The FAA said in a statement late Tuesday that the Wall Street Journal story was incorrect to suggest the agency is conducting a safety probe on the Boeing Max.

The FAA is not conducting a probe separate from the ongoing Lion Air accident investigation that the agency, the National Transportation Safety Board and Indonesian officials are a part of, the FAA said.

“As we have previously said, we have issued an (airworthiness directive) and will continue to take appropriate action based on what we learn from the investigation. This has not changed,” the FAA said.

The FAA and Boeing continue to evaluate the need for software and/or other design changes to the aircraft including operating procedures and training as we learn more from the ongoing investigation, the regulator said.

Boeing did not respond to requests for comment outside regular business hours.

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A Lion Air Boeing 737 MAX 8 crashed on Oct. 29 minutes after taking off from Jakarta, killing all 189 people aboard.

Reporting by Kanishka Singh in Bengaluru and David Shepardson in Washington; Editing by Leslie Adler and Sunil Nair

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Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
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Jewish groups slam Fox News for inviting back pro-Trump lawyers after anti-Semitic remarks

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Less than a month after inviting backlash from Jewish groups for voicing antisemitic tropes during an interview on Fox Business, conservative lawyers and Trump loyalists Joe diGenova and Victoria Toensing are back on Fox's airwaves as of this Monday night.

In a series of statements released this Tuesday, the Anti-Defamation League and J Street called diGenova’s return “disturbing," adding that his appearance shows a "lack of remorse" on the network's part for inviting him back on, The Daily Beast reports.

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GOP’s Kevin McCarthy repeatedly lies in Trump defense against articles of impeachment

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House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy defended President Donald Trump from the articles of impeachment issued by Democrats, and he was roundly criticized for lying about the evidence.

The California Republican complained that the minority was not allowed to call witnesses during impeachment hearings, and then cited testimony from a GOP witness to defend the president.

"We watched in a hearing, a Democrat constitutional scholar that did not vote for President Trump say this was the weakest, the thinnest, the fastest impeachment in the history of America," McCarthy said. "He then went to say if there was an abuse it would be abuse on the Democrats to move forward. The speaker must not have listened to that hearing. If the speaker had only waited 48 hours to release the transcript, America would not be put through the nightmare."

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Trump to meet with top Russian foreign minister amid impeachment battle

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Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov on Tuesday opened a visit to Washington in which he will meet Donald Trump, the very day when Democrats unveiled impeachment charges against the president.

The timing marks a redux of the veteran Russian diplomat's last visit to Washington in May 2017, when Trump was fighting off allegations that he cooperated with Russia and was accused of sharing classified information with Lavrov.

Lavrov began the day of talks by meeting with Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, who said the Trump administration was determined to pursue its work despite the politics at home.

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