Quantcast
Connect with us

Angry ‘Child of Krakatoa’ rumbles on

Published

on

The volcano that apparently triggered a deadly tsunami in Indonesia late Saturday emerged from the sea around the legendary Krakatoa 90 years ago and has been on a high-level eruption watchlist for the past decade.

Anak Krakatoa (the “Child of Krakatoa”) has been particularly active since June, occasionally sending massive plumes of ash high into the sky and in October a tour boat was nearly hit by lava bombs from the erupting volcano.

ADVERTISEMENT

Experts say Anak Krakatoa emerged around 1928 in the caldera of Krakatoa, a volcanic island that violently erupted in 1883.

With subsequent lava flows it grew from a submarine setting to become a small volcanic island, with the cone now standing at an altitude of around 300 metres (1,000 feet) above sea level.

Since its birth, Anak Krakatoa has been in a “state of semi-continuous eruptive activity”, growing bigger as it experiences eruptions every two to three years, volcanology professor Ray Cas from Monash University in Australia told AFP.

“Most of the eruptions are relatively small on the scale of explosive eruptions … and there’s also eruptions that produce lava flows,” he added.

Cas said the latest event appeared to be “a relatively small explosive eruption” but could then have triggered or coincided with a submarine event like a landslide or earthquake, causing the deadly tsunami.

ADVERTISEMENT

No one lives on the island, but the peak is popular with tourists and is a major study area for volcanologists.

When Krakatoa erupted on August 27, 1883 it shot a column of ash more than 20 kilometres (12 miles) into the air in a series of powerful explosions that were heard in Australia and up to 4,500 kilometres away near Mauritius.

The massive cloud of ash plunged the area into darkness for two days. The dust gave rise to spectacular sunsets and sunrises around the world the following year and disrupted weather patterns for years.

ADVERTISEMENT

The tsunami triggered by the eruption killed more than 36,000 people in one of the world’s worst natural disasters.

Indonesia’s proximity to the junction of three continental plates, which jostle under immense pressure, makes it particularly vulnerable to earthquakes and eruptions.

ADVERTISEMENT

The archipelago nation has nearly 130 active volcanoes, forming part of the Pacific “Ring of Fire” — an arc of intense seismic activity that stretches from quake-prone Japan through Southeast Asia and across the Pacific basin.

 


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Facebook

Israel heads for third election in a year as deadline to form government expires

Published

on

Israel is heading for an unprecedented third election within a year after a deadline to create a coalition government ran out at midnight local time on Wednesday and parliament was dissolved.

The prospect of a new election prolongs a political stalemate that has paralysed the government and undermined many citizens' faith in the democratic process.

Initial elections in April were inconclusive and a September re-run of the vote left Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and his chief challenger Benny Gantz short of securing the required parliamentary majority to form a government.

Continue Reading

Facebook

‘Flashback much?’: Senator mocked for saying IG report made him feel like he had ‘dropped acid’

Published

on

“About 25 percent of the way through it I thought I dropped acid. It’s surreal.”

A prominent Republican Senator is getting his own special due process on social media after using his precious time to question U.S. Dept. of Justice Inspector General Michael Horowitz by saying reading the 434 page report on the FBI's Russia investigation was like dropping acid.

U.S. Senator John Kennedy (R-LA) admitted to Horowitz on Wednesday that he had not finished reading the lengthy document but was about 70 percent done. He also appeared to be trying to make the infractions about FISA warrants committed by FBI agents to be seen as unprecedented and historically offensive, in an attempt to serve President Donald Trump by damaging the reputation of the FBI.

Continue Reading
 

Facebook

Republicans are leaning towards a short impeachment trial in the Senate with no witnesses: report

Published

on

According to an exclusive report from Bloomberg, Senate Republicans are saying there's a growing "early consensus" that a short impeachment trial that could see the GOP-led chamber "vote on a likely acquittal of President Donald Trump without hearing from any witnesses" is the way to go.

"Senator Ron Johnson, a Wisconsin Republican, said a growing number of the Senate’s 53 GOP members want to simply let House Democrats make their case to impeach the president and then hear a rebuttal from Trump’s team before moving immediately to a vote on the articles of impeachment," Bloomberg's Laura Litvan and Steven T. Dennis report.

Continue Reading