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Ex-prosecutor reveals one major charge Mueller left off Manafort filing that looks like a hidden trap for Trump

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Special counsel Robert Mueller left out one key charge of lying by Paul Manafort — which directly involves President Donald Trump.

Former federal prosecutor Cynthia Alksne explained the legal dynamics of the revelation during a Saturday appearance on MSNBC’s “AM Joy” with guest host Jonathan Capehart.

Capehart read the defense to the Manafort filings offered by the White House.

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“The government’s filing in Mr. Manafort’s case says nothing about the president. It says even less about collusion and is devoted almost entirely to lobbying-related issues. Once again the media is trying to create a story where there isn’t one,” press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders argued.

“Cynthia, there’s a story here, isn’t there?” Capehart asked.

“I believe there’s a rather large story here,” she replied.

“The document is interesting, because it’s, of course, not complete. It says right in the first paragraph all the good stuff is being filed under seal,” Alksne replied. “So the reason why Sarah Huckabee Sanders doesn’t get to read it is because Bob Mueller is not ready to give it to her.”

“There are also other things are missing here that might not be under seal. For example, there was a whole issue with Manafort double-dealing and spying and violating joint defense agreements — it’s just not mentioned here,” she noted.

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“That was a big deal when it was revealed that he was back-channeling to the White House,” Capehart reminded. “Explain the significance of that.”

“Double dealing — being a fink and a spy,” she argued. “It’s very bad to be a fink and a spy.”

“What’s interesting about it is when did the Mueller people find out? And if they found out in time, did they do anything about it?” she asked. “Since they knew he was feeding information to other people, did they feed him some information that affected Trump’s answers to his questions?”

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“How exactly did that work?” Alksne wondered. “It’s just a big gaping hole here — and it’s fascinating.”

Watch:

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‘They just fired on us’: Horrifying videos of cops ‘using journalists for target practice’ in Minneapolis

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Journalists covering the protests in Minneapolis reported on being targeted by police on Saturday.

Multiple reports -- including live coverage on CNN -- showed police firing rubber bullets at journalists.

It’s open season on the media for the cops in Minneapolis. Evil. https://t.co/ZR3Nnf9ofH

— Nick Stellini (@StelliniTweets) May 31, 2020

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Scientists warn of ‘superspreaders’ as Americans flock back to restaurants, salons and churches

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SAN DIEGO — Churches. Hair salons. Restaurants. Malls. What do they all have in common?They’ve all been cleared to reopen in San Diego County amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic — and by and large, they all require people to congregate inside, potentially with strangers.This comes as an increasingly vocal group of scientists has sounded the alarm about the danger of indoor gatherings due to the potential for airborne transmission of the disease by “superspreaders.”This week Kimberly Prather of UC San Diego’s Scripps Institution of Oceanography penned an urgently worded perspective paper in t... (more…)

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About 75% of Trump’s proposed coronavirus capital gains tax cut would go to the top 1% of earners

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Roughly three-quarters of the benefits from the capital gains tax cut floated by President Donald Trump as part of the administration's coronavirus relief plan would go to the top 1% of earners, according to the Tax Policy Center.

Trump has repeatedly floated a cut to capital gains taxes, which are taxes paid by investors on profits made when an asset, like stock or real estate, is sold. The capital gains tax rate is already 35% lower than the top income tax rate, and only about 6% of households in the bottom 80% of earners claim any capital gains, meaning the overwhelming majority of benefits would flow to the wealthy.

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