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Judge to examine whether President Donald Trump violated the US Constitution by appointing Matthew Whitaker

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A federal judge on Monday is set to consider whether President Donald Trump violated the U.S. Constitution by appointing Matthew Whitaker as acting attorney general, part of a broader lawsuit challenging his administration’s restrictions on asylum for immigrants.

Setting aside established succession practices, the Republican president last month named Whitaker, a Trump loyalist, as the top U.S. law enforcement official after ousting Jeff Sessions as attorney general.

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A decision by U.S. District Judge Randolph Moss could have ramifications for immigrants seeking asylum and for Whitaker’s tenure at the Justice Department as he waits for the U.S. Senate to confirm President Donald Trump’s permanent nominee for attorney general, William Barr.

The lawsuit challenges Trump’s asylum ban for immigrants who illegally cross the U.S. border on the grounds that it violates immigration laws and the Administrative Procedure Act, a statute that governs federal rule-writing procedures.

The lawsuit also makes a constitutional case for why the asylum rules are invalid: that Trump violated the Constitution’s so-called Appointments Clause when he appointed Whitaker because the job of attorney general is a “principal officer” who must be confirmed by the Senate, unlike Whitaker.

It is unclear whether Moss will rule on that point.

On Friday, Moss heard arguments in a different case also challenging Whitaker’s legitimacy as acting attorney general. Altogether, there are at least nine different legal challenges pending in courts around the country to Whitaker’s appointment.

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The asylum restrictions at issue in Monday’s case were made by Trump through a presidential proclamation in November and an interim final rule issued by the departments of justice and homeland security. The rules were put on hold in November by San Francisco-based U.S. District Judge Jon Tigar.

The San Francisco-based 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals refused to lift the temporary restraining order, saying the Trump administration had “not established that it is likely to prevail.”

Last week, the Justice Department asked the Supreme Court to let Trump’s asylum order take effect as litigation over it proceeds. Tigar will preside over a hearing on Wednesday and will consider whether to impose a more long-lasting injunction.

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The case in court on Monday was filed on behalf of several immigrants seeking asylum, including a Honduran man who fled his country with his daughter after a gang threatened to kill his family.

Reporting by Sarah N. Lynch; Editing by Will Dunham

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‘This is a lie’: Lisa Page pummels Trump for telling blatant falsehoods about her at crazed rally

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Former FBI attorney Lisa Page on Wednesday called out President Donald Trump for once again lying about her at one of his political rallies.

On Tuesday night, Trump told supporters in Pennsylvania that Page supposedly had to file a restraining order against former FBI agent Peter Strzok, with whom she'd had a relationship during the 2016 presidential campaign.

Trump hedged his claim by telling his supporters, "That's what I heard, I don't know if it's true."

Page, however, took to Twitter to shred the president for repeating a blatant falsehood.

"This is a lie," she wrote. "Nothing like this ever happened. I wish we had a president who knew how to act like one."

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Trump busted for lying about NATO in days-late response to world leaders mocking him

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President Donald Trump responded to a week-old tweet from a Fox Business personality about Canada's prime minister and other world leaders mocking him, and spouted misleading claims about NATO allies.

The president falsely claimed in his response to Charles Payne that Justin Trudeau, along with French president Emmanuel Macron and British prime minister Boris Johnson, were actually angry and not laughing about his bizarre news conference at the NATO summit.

"They were just upset that I demanded they pay their fair share for NATO," Trump claimed, four days after Payne's tweet. "Their countries are delinquent. I raised $530 Billion more from NATO countries! Thank you Charles."

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Trump forced to pay up after his charity is exposed as a sham

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Donald Trump on Tuesday paid $2 million in damages as part of a settlement over use of his former charity to further his political and business interests -- the latest item on the US president's list of legal woes.

Trump had been accused of using foundation funds to settle lawsuits, promote his Trump-branded hotels, and for personal spending, including the purchase of a portrait of himself to display at one of his golf clubs.

The $2 million was paid equally to eight different charities, including the Children's Aid Society, the United Negro College Fund and the US Holocaust Memorial Museum, according to a statement from New York Attorney General Letitia James, a Democrat.

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