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Penny Marshall, ‘Big’ director and TV’s ‘Laverne,’ dead at 75 -media

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Penny Marshall, the endearingly graceless actress with the thick Bronx accent who starred on U.S. television’s “Laverne & Shirley” before becoming a pioneering film director with hits including “Big” and “A League of Their Own,” has died at 75, the New York Daily News reported on Tuesday.

Marshall died of complications of diabetes at her home in California on Monday, the newspaper reported, citing Marshall’s publicist.

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(Reporting by Will Dunham in Washington; Editing by Scott Malone and Diane Craft)


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Watch: It takes less than 5 minutes for Democrats’ counsel to make the case for impeaching Trump

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Devin Nunes’ explanations for Lev Parnas calls are getting increasingly far-fetched

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Rep. Devin Nunes (R-CA) has been making increasingly wild claims to explain away his role in the Ukraine scandal.

The California Republican has offered far-fetched explanation for his calls to Rudy Giuliani's indicted associate Lev Parnas, and he's threatened to sue CNN and The Daily Beast for reporting claims made about him by Parnas' lawyer, reported Vox.

Nunes spoke to the Ukrainian-born Parnas multiple times, according to phone records obtained by the House Intelligence Committee that Nunes sits on, but he has claimed he doesn't recall Parnas' name and also that one call may have come from Parnas' wife.

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What the Trump impeachment inquiry means for the rest of the world

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Once again, the United States is experiencing the profound drama of Presidential impeachment proceedings. But, dissimilar from the past, this time the implications for the rest of the world could be large.

Consider the two modern predecessors to today’s impeachment inquiry into President Donald J. Trump’s attempt to persuade Ukraine’s government to begin a criminal investigation of one of his leading Democratic challengers, former Vice President Joe Biden and Biden’s son Hunter.

The first was the slow-brewing crisis that began with a midnight break-in at the Democratic National Committee’s offices at the Watergate Hotel in Washington in 1972. This impeachment went on for two years and consumed the American political system. It finally ended in President Richard Nixon’s resignation in August 1974. The second was the special counsel investigation of President William J. Clinton, who was impeached in the U.S. House of Representatives but acquitted by the Senate in 1999.

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