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The truth about the Steele Dossier: Experts compare the infamous memo with Mueller’s findings

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A former U.S. attorney and a Harvard Law student teamed up to revisit the Steele dossier by cross-referencing it with special counsel Robert Mueller’s findings — and unveiled which parts of it hold water.

Former federal prosecutor Chuck Rosenberg and Harvard Law student Sarah Grant wrote for Lawfare that many of the findings made public as part of Mueller’s probe confirm “both specifically and thematically” aspects of the dossier.

“The dossier holds up well over time,” the scholars wrote, “and none of it, to our knowledge, has been disproven.”

In an interview Saturday morning with MSNBC’s David Gura, Rosenberg noted that during his sentencing, Donald Trump’s former “fixer” Michael Cohen essentially “acknowledged and admitted to” the business ties between the Trump Organization and Russia that were first alleged in the dossier.

In this dossier, former British spy Christopher Steele claimed that between March and September 2016, some Russian entities “had been using botnets and porn traffic to transmit viruses, plant bugs, steal data and conduct ‘altering operations’ against the Democratic Party leadership.”

That claim was corroborated, the scholars wrote in Lawfare, by Mueller’s indictment of 12 Russian intelligence officers — including the dates.

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Another of Grant and Rosenberg’s key findings included the now-publicly confirmed association between Trump confidante Roger Stone and Wikileaks through a Russian “conspirator” using the pseudonym Guccifer 2.0.

In the draft statement of offense for Stone-connected author Jerome Corsi, the pair noted, corroborates the trail between the Trump campaign and Russian intelligence.

Official filings related to Mueller, their report noted, “connects Russian intelligence—behind the guise of Guccifer 2.0—to Wikileaks and, to a lesser extent, to Stone.”

Mueller’s filings, they added, haven’t corroborated the dossier’s claim that a Russian intelligence “operation had been conducted with the full knowledge and support of Trump and senior members of his campaign team.”

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“Mueller and his team have not yet alleged or asserted in public filings that individuals associated with the Trump campaign knew that Guccifer 2.0 was a Russian intelligence cover and that the documents in Wikileaks’s possession came from Russian government hackers,” Grant and Rosenberg wrote.

Read the entire report via Lawfare and watch video of Rosenberg explaining the analysis below:

Report typos and corrections to [email protected].
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‘He should be hospitalized’: Internet stunned after Trump goes off on completely incoherent Mt Rushmore rant

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President Donald Trump was asked on Tuesday whether his face should appear on Mount Rushmore along with other major American presidents.

“If I answer that question yes, I will end up with such bad publicity,” Trump told The Hill, before pivoting to an incoherent rant about fireworks.

The president's rambling shocked many people on Twitter:

Apart from Trump’s apparent inability to string together coherent English sentences on the fly, note also the sheer ignorance and apathy toward the idea that there might be legitimate reasons why fireworks are not detonated around the Black Hills. https://t.co/jja2XD19Mw

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Trump: Immigrants didn’t want to come to America before I was president because ‘Obama wasn’t a cheerleader’

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President Donald Trump's strange rant about fireworks at Mt. Rushmore wasn't the only head-scratching exchange that occurred during his recent interview with reporters from The Hill.

During another part of the interview, Trump was asked about Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez's (D-NY) criticism of the internment camps he's been using to house immigrant children.

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Trump is unhappy in reality — so he’s inviting everyone into his world of make-believe: columnist

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Confabulation is an unintentional event where someone's memory creates "fabricated, distorted, or misinterpreted memories about oneself or the world." Parataxic distortion is when a person tends to "skew perceptions" of others based on fantasy. Then there's political opportunism, a "diagnosis" that plagues politicians almost exclusively. Regardless of the cause, Washington Post syndicated columnist Michael Gerson noted President Donald Trump is not only creating his own reality, he's inviting his supporters to live inside of it.

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