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Former Trump adviser: White House position on shutdown ‘makes absolutely no sense whatsoever’

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On Thursday, the Boston Globe published remarks from an interview with Gary Cohn, President Donald Trump’s former economic adviser, in which he blasted the president’s federal government shutdown over the border wall and suggested that the White House had no sensible exit strategy from the situation:

On Thursday, the Boston Globe published remarks from an interview with Gary Cohn, President Donald Trump’s former economic adviser, in which he blasted the president’s federal government shutdown over the border wall and suggested that the White House had no sensible exit strategy from the situation:

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Cohn, in the interview, sharply criticized the ongoing shutdown, calling it “completely wrong,” and said the furloughing of thousands of federal workers “makes absolutely no sense whatsoever.”

“I don’t understand what the outcome is here, and I don’t understand where we’re going with it,” said Cohn, a free-trade advocate who resigned last March after Trump announced he was imposing tariffs on steel and aluminum imports. “I’m confused as to what the White House’s strategy is on this a little bit.”

Cohn’s bemusement at the president’s strategy is understandable. The border wall is unpopular in polling, the shutdown over it is even more so, the public overwhelmingly blames Trump for the standoff, and the White House seems completely uninterested in offering any concessions to lawmakers to get anything they want. In fact, some of Trump’s advisers, like Office of Management and Budget director and acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney seem to think it’s actually a good thing the government is shut down, despite the fact that it is starting to risk serious economic damage.

Cohn, a former Goldman Sachs executive, is hardly a foe of the Republican agenda. Before he fell out with Trump over his tariff strategy, Cohn played a key role in passing the GOP tax scam bill, which showered benefits on the wealthiest Americans and multinational corporations even as it has exploded deficit spending.

Next month, Cohn will take up a new position at Harvard University’s Institute of Politics, alongside his longtime acquaintance, former Democratic Sen. Heidi Heitkamp (D-ND).


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WATCH: Franklin Graham tells Jeanine Pirro coronavirus pandemic is because of people sinning

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Franklin Graham blamed sinners for the COVID-19 coronavirus epidemic during a Saturday night appearance on Fox News.

Host Jeanine Pirro noted the growing death toll and wondered how God could let that happen.

"Well, I don't think it's God's plan for this to happen," Graham said.

"It's because of the sin that's in the world, judge," he argued.

"Man has turned his back on God, we have sinned against him, and we need to ask for God's forgiveness and that's what Easter's all about," he continued.

"This pandemic, this is the result of a fallen world that has turned its back on God," he added.

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Drought causing water shortage amid coronavirus crisis in Chile

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With historically low river flows and reservoirs running dry due to drought, people in central Chile have found themselves particularly vulnerable to the coronavirus pandemic.

Years of resource exploitation and lax legislation have allowed most reservoirs in that part of the country to run dry.

"There are now 400,000 families, nearly 1.5 million people approximately, whose supply of 50 liters of water a day depends on tankers," Rodrigo Mundaca, spokesman for the Movement for the Defense of Water, the Earth and the Protection of the Environment, told AFP.

One of the main pieces of advice to protect people against coronavirus is to wash your hands regularly.

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Trump warns of ‘tough week’ ahead — after the United States surpassed 300,000 coronavirus victims

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US President Donald Trump warned Americans on Saturday to brace for a "very horrendous" number of coronavirus deaths in the coming days as the total number of global fatalities from the pandemic soared past 60,000.

As confirmed COVID-19 cases in the United States surpassed 300,000 with more than 8,300 deaths, there was some encouraging news in Italy and Spain.

Europe continues to bear the brunt of the epidemic, however, accounting for over 45,000 of the worldwide deaths, and Britain reported a new daily high in fatalities.

There are now more than 1.17 million confirmed coronavirus cases around the world and there have been 63,437 deaths since the virus emerged in China late last year.

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