Quantcast
Connect with us

Mike Pompeo expects ‘good marker’ with North Korea by the end of February

Published

on

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said on Tuesday there remained “an awful lot of work to do” to achieve the denuclearization of North Korea but he anticipates further progress by the end of next month, when the U.S. and North Korean leaders are expected to meet for a second summit.

Pompeo, addressing the World Economic Forum in Davos via satellite link, said he believed by the end of February “we’ll have another good marker along the way” with North Korea.

ADVERTISEMENT

“There remains an awful lot of work to do, but good things have happened already,” Pompeo said, referring to a freeze in North Korean nuclear and missile testing since 2017.

The White House said last week President Donald Trump would hold a second summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in late February, but the United States would maintain economic sanctions on Pyongyang.

The announcement came during a visit to Washington by Kim’s chief nuclear envoy Kim Yong Chol.

Despite upbeat U.S. comments there has been no indication of any narrowing of differences over U.S. demands that North Korea abandon a nuclear weapons program that threatens the United States and Pyongyang’s demands for a lifting of punishing sanctions.

ADVERTISEMENT

Pompeo said last week’s talks brought “further progress” and was an opportunity for U.S. Special Representative for North Korea Stephen Biegun to meet his “newly designated counterpart.”

“They were able to discuss some of the complicated issues towards achieving what the two leaders laid out back last June in Singapore,” he said.

Pompeo said there had been “a little bit more progress” in discussions at the weekend in Stockholm, where Biegun met North Korean Vice Foreign Minister Choe Son Hui.

ADVERTISEMENT

Washington has been keen to set up talks between Biegun and Choe but North Korea has resisted, apparently wanting to keep exchanges with the United States at high level.

Pompeo said he saw an important role for the private sector in helping to develop North Korea “if we can make a substantial step towards achieving denuclearization and create the right conditions.”

“We did have a good conversation about that,” Pompeo said. “There’s not much role for the private sector today, but if we’re successful … it’ll be the private sector that sits there, looming in the background,” he said.

ADVERTISEMENT

Pompeo said he knew the North Koreans understood the need for a private sector role, “whether that’s power for the people of the country, whether it’s to install the infrastructure that is so desperately needed.”

“If we’re able to achieve that full denuclearization that I know the entire world wants, the private sector will be an important player in achieving the final elements of the agreement as well,” he said without elaborating.

Reporting by Mark Trevelyan in Davos and David Brunnstrom in Washington; Editing by James Dalgleish

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Trump encourages China to take advantage of Jay Powell and Fed: They ‘don’t have a clue’

Published

on

President Donald Trump launched a new attack against his own Federal Reserve chairman in a pair of Monday morning tweets.

The president has been publicly pressuring Fed chairman Jerome Powell to lower interest rates in hopes of staving off a recession, but the Trump appointee has so far resisted his calls.

"Producer prices in China shrank most in 3 years due to China’s big devaluation of their currency, coupled with monetary stimulus," Trump tweeted. "Federal Reserve not watching? Will Fed ever get into the game? Dollar strongest EVER! Really bad for exports. No Inflation...Highest Interest Rates..."

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Internet pummels Trump for frantic demand to investigate Obama instead: ‘This is not the tweet of an innocent man’

Published

on

President Donald Trump jealously raged against Barack Obama's post-presidency business deals, which includes a production agreement with Netflix -- and other social media users ridiculed his apparent envy.

Trump questioned that deal and others in a pair of tweets complaining about an impeachment inquiry launched against him last week by the House Judiciary Committee, and he suggested Congress look at Obama's business since he left the White House.

....work that way. I have a better idea. Look at the Obama Book Deal, or the ridiculous Netflix deal. Then look at all the deals made by the Dems in Congress, the “Congressional Slush Fund,” and lastly the IG Reports. Take a look at them. Those investigations would be over FAST!

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Is the Trump administration squelching a whistleblower — and a major scandal?

Published

on

America's system of government has always worked on the honor system. With so few Senate-confirmed Cabinet and federal agency heads, and so many “acting” officials working in the Trump administration, people who are constantly forced to audition for permanent positions are now under tremendous pressure to protect a president hellbent on breaking every norm of good governance. Now a new possible political scandal could be brewing in the Trump administration that tests the loyalty of these “acting” officials — pitting their allegiance to the nation against their desire to impress their boss.

Continue Reading
 
 
Help Raw Story Uncover Injustice. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image