Quantcast
Connect with us

Oscar-crowned French composer Michel Legrand dies at 86

Published

on

French composer and pianist Michel Legrand has died at 86 after a career in which he stood out for soundtracks in screen musicals with Catherine Deneuve and that won him three Oscars.

The artist died earlier on Saturday, according to a message posted on his Facebook page by his management company City Lights.

“A composer of genius, his unlimited talent, celebrated all over the world, brought such emotion. This morning we are all humming a song of Michel Legrand,” France’s Culture Minister Franck Riester said on Twitter.

ADVERTISEMENT

Born in 1932 in Paris and son of conductor and composer Raymond Legrand, he trained at a music conservatory in the French capital before starting his career as a musician and songwriter with popular singers like Maurice Chevalier.

He rose to fame in the 1960s by turning to film scores, notably teaming up with director Jacques Demy for a series of musicals, including “The Umbrellas of Cherbourg” (“Les Parapluies de Cherbourg”) that was awarded the top-prize Palme d’or at the Cannes festival in 1964.

Legrand described the scepticism surrounding the future Cannes winner, in which a cast led by a young Catherine Deneuve sing their dialogue rather than songs in the traditional style of musicals.

“Jacques and I had to work really hard to get this project off the ground,” Legrand said in remarks on his official website.

“The producers showed us the door saying: ‘You’re a couple of nice young guys, but do you really think that people will spend an hour-and-a-half listening to characters singing life’s little platitudes!’”

ADVERTISEMENT

Legrand worked with Demy and Deneuve in more screen musicals, while also collaborating with other rising stars of French cinema like Jean-Luc Godard and Claude Lellouch.

He soon established his name in the United States by working with jazz stars like Miles Davis and Stan Getz, and penning music for Hollywood films.

He was feted with three Oscars.

ADVERTISEMENT

In 1968, he won the best original song prize for “The Windmills Of Your Mind” which featured in the soundtrack to “The Thomas Crown Affair”. Three years later he claimed the best soundtrack award for the film “The Summer of ‘42”, before winning the best score prize again for “Yentl” starring Barbra Streisand in 1983.

Legrand had continued his career in recent years as a concert performer and had been due to go on tour in France this year.

ADVERTISEMENT

Reporting by Gus Trompiz and Henri-Pierre Andre; Editing by Clelia Oziel


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Facebook

Trump’s desire to put the Bidens on trial in the Senate is nothing but a ‘fever dream’: MSNBC reporter

Published

on

MSNBC political contributor Jake Sherman explained that President Donald Trump wants to hold a Senate trial against former Vice President Joe Biden and his son Hunter, but that even in the hyper-partisan era, it's nothing more than a "fever dream."

Reports reveal that Trump wants to turn the impeachment trial in the Republican Senate into a reality television show where he can make the case against the Bidens to justify his bribery of Ukraine. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) shut the president down.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Congressional subpoenas will be ‘forever unenforceable’ if GOP lets Trump off the hook: conservative attorney

Published

on

Conservative attorney Gabriel Malor, who in the past has written legal analyses for right-wing publications such as The Federalist and the Washington Examiner, warns that Republicans will be setting a dangerous precedent if they let President Donald Trump off the hook for his unprecedented obstruction of the House of Representatives' impeachment inquiry.

Writing on Twitter, Malor argues that giving Trump a pass on the House's proposed obstruction of Congress charge will neuter any future congressional inquiry into the executive branch.

"There's a real danger that if the Senate does not convict on the obstruction of Congress count, congressional subpoenas will be forever unenforceable," he writes. "If Congress itself rules that defiance of congressional subpoenas is no error, how could the courts in any future litigation?"

Continue Reading
 

Facebook

Lawmakers green light US space force

Published

on

The United States is getting a new space force along with $738 billion in military spending under an agreement backed by lawmakers on Tuesday that fulfils a priority of President Donald Trump.

The fiscal year 2020 spending in the National Defense Authorization Act is a jump from the $716 billion authorized last year, and will go to pay for a wide range of military activities.

It will also create a space-based sixth branch of the military, a priority of Trump's, after the army, air force, navy, Marine Corps and coast guard.

The bill has won the approval of Democratic and Republican lawmakers in both the House and Senate armed services committees, making its passage in Congress likely.

The bill, which Congress must pass each year, allocates $635 billion to the Pentagon, and another $23.1 billion to the Department of Energy for the US nuclear arsenal's maintenance and fuel.

Continue Reading