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Pentagon increasingly concerned that Trump’s partisan decisions are beginning to impact the military: CNN

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CNN Pentagon correspondent Barbara Starr said Thursday that Pentagon officials are growing increasingly concerned that President Donald Trump’s partisan decisions -such as his tit-for-tat decision today to deny House Speaker Nancy Pelosi access to a military plane for an upcoming trip to Afghanistan- are beginning to upset the military.

Starr said that as commander in chief Trump “can pick up the phone and say to the Air Force, ‘don’t give them an airplane,'” but questioned his motivations.

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“What the president is doing here is making a political, partisan case,” Starr said. “He’s calling it a public relations event. I suspect the troops in Afghanistan and the military families who have their troops in that war zone feel very differently about that.”

She added that while the Pentagon was likely informed in advance that Trump was canceling Pelosi’s trip, she said officials were likely unhappy about it.

“What we are seeing time and again now, to be very blunt, are partisan decisions being made by the White House that do impact the military and in the rank and file, you’re beginning to see a lot of reaction,” Starr said.

“‘Why is this happening, what’s behind all of this, what’s the president up to, what’s he going to do next?'” she continued. “I must tell you that more and more that’s the conversation that you do hear in the Pentagon hallways.”

Watch the video below.

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Trump is ‘asleep at the switch’ in his bunker while America needs a unifying voice: CNN’s Keith Boykin

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On CNN Monday, former Bill Clinton staffer and CNN commentator Keith Boykin laid out the extent of President Donald Trump's failure in a moment of national crisis.

"Keith, do you feel this time at all may be different as far as a real outcome?" asked anchor Brooke Baldwin.

"I definitely feel this is different," said Boykin. "Think about the conditions that we're in right now. We have 41 million people who don't have jobs. You have 100,000 people who have died from the coronavirus pandemic, disproportionally black and brown people, and people outraged about the shooting and killing and murders of black men and women and the George Floyd incident and Breonna Taylor and Ahmaud Arbery, where people have no place to go, nothing to do. No school or jobs to go to. No distractions. It is not like the typical protest in the past that could go back to work or class. They could spend all summer just being upset unless there is a substantive change."

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CNN

Trump is ‘capable of reading’ a unifying message — but it’s doubtful he’ll mean it: Atlanta mayor

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Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms on Monday expressed little confidence that President Donald Trump could unify the nation at a time when the United States faces a triple threat of a recession, a pandemic, and civil unrest.

During an interview on CNN, host Alisyn Camerota asked Bottoms about actions Trump could possibly take to calm nerves and bring the country together.

"What about the debate that we are told is going on in the White House, as to whether or not the president should at this moment make some sort of national statement and call for unity?" she asked. "Would you like to see that?"

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CNN

Racist cops, COVID-19 and unemployment are sending black Americans into ‘despair’: Charles Blow

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The multiple crises hitting the United States at the moment are hitting the black community particularly hard, and New York Times columnist Charles Blow said on Monday that it's sending people into deep despair.

While appearing on CNN, Blow said that the nationwide protests that have erupted in the wake of George Floyd's killing last week were about much more than the death of just one man.

"You add on top of that all the other conditions, which you spoke before, about this happening in the middle of a pandemic," he said. "Everybody's at home. 40 million people have filed for unemployment. They don't know where their next check is coming from... The idea that [unemployment] is disproportionately affecting black people, that COVID is disproportionately affecting black people that, police brutality is disproportionately affecting black people, it's all part of the despair."

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